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Tabook Point ~ Tzee-Tzee-lal-itch Origin Washington Geographical Names

Tabook Point, on the western shore of Toandos Peninsula, Dabob Bay, in the eastern part of Jefferson County. The name was first charted by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Tacoma, principal city of Pierce County, on Commencement Bay, now known as Tacoma Harbor. The name is said to be of Indian origin, but its source and meaning have been the subjects of much debate and disputation. Of all those who have written on the subject, the best authority is undoubtedly Thomas W. Prosch. A pioneer newspaper man with a bent toward history, he had the advantage accompanying such training. Furthermore, on September 12, 1877, he was married to Miss Virginia McCarver, whose father, General Morton Matthew McCarver, reputed founder of the City of Tacoma, had been dead only two years at the time of his daughter's wedding. Mr. Prosch had thus entered upon access to family traditions and records. In 1906 and 1909, Mr. Prosch wrote and published two books - McCarver and Tacoma, and The Cotihliug-Prosch Family-m which he tells with clearness and frankness how General McCarver founded and named Tacoma and how a contention over the naming arose at the very beginning. lie shows the first settler of Tacoma to have been Nicholas Dclin, wlio arrived in 1852 and began a small water-power sawmill. Peter jiid^on and family, members of the famous party of immigrants who rrn^vrd the Naches Pass in 1853, were tlie jifKt to RtUlle on tlic b.iy. There were others who found employment in and around the nnll. \\ hen the Indian war broke out in 1855, the white people left the bay and Mr. Dehn sold his mill to J. L. Perkins, he to Milas Galliher, the last owner being I'rank Spinning. For several years prior to 1864, the south side of the ba\' was deserted. On Christmas day of 1864, Job Carr settled there. His family are often counted the first settlers of Tacoma. In 1868, General McCarver arrived looking for a townsite that would serve as the terminus of the proposed Northern Pacific Railroad. He bought most of Job Carr's claim and acquired other lands. He had financial associates in Portland. The fifst plat of the proposed town bore the name "Commencement City," a name derived from that of the bay. This plat was not tiled of record. On Friday, September 11, 1868, Philip Ritz arrived at the McCarver home. He was gathering information for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company and had heard of General McCarver's proposal to build a town. He wanted to suggest a name. He was enthusiastic about the book The Canoe and the Saddle, by Theodore VV^inthrop, in which it was said the Indians knew Mount Rainier by the name of Tacoma. He was eloquent in advocating that name for the town. Mr. Prosch says sleep was banished from the McCarver home that night and Saturday morning found the family still talking over the new name. (McCarver and Tacoma, page 164.) The associates in Portland accepted General T\icCarver's suggestion that the new name be put upon the plat instead of "Conuiiencement City" and the naming was accomplished. Mr. Prosch says: "The Indian name for the land taken by the Carrs was Chebaulip. None of the citizens heeded that, and as the Indians themselves had little regard for their own nauies, and were always willing to adopt those of the whites instead, Chebaulip was passed and forgotten." (McCarver and Tacoma, pages 162-163.) A later and more extended publication is Tacoma, Its History and Its Builders, A Half Century of Activity, by Herbert Hunt, published in Chicago in V)\(\ Mr. Hunt devotes pages 134 to 141 to a discussion of tlie name. It does not dilTer materially in results from the record of Tiiomas W. I'rosch. However, he says (page 135): "That it was lav(H-ably received may be assumed from the fact that Anthony Carr, M. M. McCarver, I(,"iin W. Ackerson and C. P. berry each has claimed the honor of appb, ing it to 'Chebaulip'." The author examines each of the claims carefully and also calls attention to the facts that a hold in Olympia and a hxlge of Good Templars had each been known bv the name Tacoma some months before it was applied lu the new [owu. Tl-.e.se two names probably emanated from the same book by Theo dore Winthrop. In 1908, Benjamin C. Hai-vey, of Tacoma, collected much material on the name which was pubHshed in Tacoma in 1914. (irashingtoji State Historical Society Publications, 1907-1914, V'ohnne 11., pages 440-464.) His work was in the interest of changing the name of Mount Rainier to "Mount Tacoma." Of course many references are there made to the origin and meaning of the word. One of the pubhshed letters is from Dr. Charles M. Buchanan, for many years in charge of the Tulalip Indian Reservation. He was the greatest authority yet developed on the Lndian languages and dialects of Puget Sound, In one of his letters to Mr. Harvey, he says Tacoma is not at all a local word but an Algonkin word meaning "near to heaven," and he calls attention to many uses of the word in various forms east of the Rocky Mountains. There are many meanings given for the word, "such as "nourishing breast," "mother of waters," "frozen waters." Several writers, in the correspondence referred to, suggest that Mr. Winthrop probably heard the Indians use the Chinook Jargon word T'kope meaning "wdiite." (Shaw's I'Jic Chinook Jargon, page 27.) Mr. Buchanan thinks it quite likely as the explosive pronunciation of T'kopt by the Indian would somewhat rescml)le the white man's pronunciation of Tacoma.

TACooTciiE-Tii;ssE, see Columbia.
Tacoutchi^, see Columbia.

TafTS0NV1ij,E, formerl)' a settlement near San De luica, Whidbey Island, named in honor of Martin and Christian Taftson who settled there in 1851. The place was charted by Surveyor General lames Tilton, in 1859, but modern maps omit the name. Taiik Prairie, see Camas Prairie.

Tauoma, see Mount Rainier.

Taiiuyeu Creek, flowing into Hood Canal, in the northeastern p;;rt of Mason County, got its name from two Indian words-"ta" meaning that, and "ho-i" meaning done. Some surmise that the Indians referred to something notable done there long ago. ( Myron Kells in A}ncrican Anthropologist for January; 1892.) Takiioma, see Mount Rainier.

Tala Point, at the entrance to Tort Pudow, in the northeastern l):irt of jefferson County. It was hrst charted by the Wilkes ICxpe-(lition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIll., Atlas, chart 78.)

Tabook Point, on the western shore of Toandos Peninsula, Dabob Bay, in the eastern part of Jefferson County. The name was first charted by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Tacoma, principal city of Pierce County, on Commencement Bay, now known as Tacoma Harbor. The name is said to be of Indian origin, but its source and meaning have been the subjects of much debate and disputation. Of all those who have written on the subject, the best authority is undoubtedly Thomas W. Prosch. A pioneer newspaper man with a bent toward history, he had the advantage accompanying such training. Furthermore, on September 12, 1877, he was married to Miss Virginia McCarver, whose father, General Morton Matthew McCarver, reputed founder of the City of Tacoma, had been dead only two years at the time of his daughter's wedding. Mr. Prosch had thus entered upon access to family traditions and records. In 1906 and 1909, Mr. Prosch wrote and published two books - McCarver and Tacoma, and The Cotihliug-Prosch Family-m which he tells with clearness and frankness how General McCarver founded and named Tacoma and how a contention over the naming arose at the very beginning. lie shows the first settler of Tacoma to have been Nicholas Dclin, wlio arrived in 1852 and began a small water-power sawmill. Peter jiid^on and family, members of the famous party of immigrants who rrn^vrd the Naches Pass in 1853, were tlie jifKt to RtUlle on tlic b.iy. There were others who found employment in and around the nnll. \\ hen the Indian war broke out in 1855, the white people left the bay and Mr. Dehn sold his mill to J. L. Perkins, he to Milas Galliher, the last owner being I'rank Spinning. For several years prior to 1864, the south side of the ba\' was deserted. On Christmas day of 1864, Job Carr settled there. His family are often counted the first settlers of Tacoma. In 1868, General McCarver arrived looking for a townsite that would serve as the terminus of the proposed Northern Pacific Railroad. He bought most of Job Carr's claim and acquired other lands. He had financial associates in Portland. The fifst plat of the proposed town bore the name "Commencement City," a name derived from that of the bay. This plat was not tiled of record. On Friday, September 11, 1868, Philip Ritz arrived at the McCarver home. He was gathering information for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company and had heard of General McCarver's proposal to build a town. He wanted to suggest a name. He was enthusiastic about the book The Canoe and the Saddle, by Theodore VV^inthrop, in which it was said the Indians knew Mount Rainier by the name of Tacoma. He was eloquent in advocating that name for the town. Mr. Prosch says sleep was banished from the McCarver home that night and Saturday morning found the family still talking over the new name. (McCarver and Tacoma, page 164.) The associates in Portland accepted General T\icCarver's suggestion that the new name be put upon the plat instead of "Conuiiencement City" and the naming was accomplished. Mr. Prosch says: "The Indian name for the land taken by the Carrs was Chebaulip. None of the citizens heeded that, and as the Indians themselves had little regard for their own nauies, and were always willing to adopt those of the whites instead, Chebaulip was passed and forgotten." (McCarver and Tacoma, pages 162-163.) A later and more extended publication is Tacoma, Its History and Its Builders, A Half Century of Activity, by Herbert Hunt, published in Chicago in V)\(\ Mr. Hunt devotes pages 134 to 141 to a discussion of tlie name. It does not dilTer materially in results from the record of Tiiomas W. I'rosch. However, he says (page 135): "That it was lav(H-ably received may be assumed from the fact that Anthony Carr, M. M. McCarver, I(,"iin W. Ackerson and C. P. berry each has claimed the honor of appb, ing it to 'Chebaulip'." The author examines each of the claims carefully and also calls attention to the facts that a hold in Olympia and a hxlge of Good Templars had each been known bv the name Tacoma some months before it was applied lu the new [owu. Tl-.e.se two names probably emanated from the same book by Theo dore Winthrop. In 1908, Benjamin C. Hai-vey, of Tacoma, collected much material on the name which was pubHshed in Tacoma in 1914. (irashingtoji State Historical Society Publications, 1907-1914, V'ohnne 11., pages 440-464.) His work was in the interest of changing the name of Mount Rainier to "Mount Tacoma." Of course many references are there made to the origin and meaning of the word. One of the pubhshed letters is from Dr. Charles M. Buchanan, for many years in charge of the Tulalip Indian Reservation. He was the greatest authority yet developed on the Lndian languages and dialects of Puget Sound, In one of his letters to Mr. Harvey, he says Tacoma is not at all a local word but an Algonkin word meaning "near to heaven," and he calls attention to many uses of the word in various forms east of the Rocky Mountains. There are many meanings given for the word, "such as "nourishing breast," "mother of waters," "frozen waters." Several writers, in the correspondence referred to, suggest that Mr. Winthrop probably heard the Indians use the Chinook Jargon word T'kope meaning "wdiite." (Shaw's I'Jic Chinook Jargon, page 27.) Mr. Buchanan thinks it quite likely as the explosive pronunciation of T'kopt by the Indian would somewhat rescml)le the white man's pronunciation of Tacoma.

TACooTciiE-Tii;ssE, see Columbia. Tacoutchi^, see Columbia.

TafTS0NV1ij,E, formerl)' a settlement near San De luica, Whidbey Island, named in honor of Martin and Christian Taftson who settled there in 1851. The place was charted by Surveyor General lames Tilton, in 1859, but modern maps omit the name. Taiik Prairie, see Camas Prairie.

Tauoma, see Mount Rainier.

Taiiuyeu Creek, flowing into Hood Canal, in the northeastern p;;rt of Mason County, got its name from two Indian words-"ta" meaning that, and "ho-i" meaning done. Some surmise that the Indians referred to something notable done there long ago. ( Myron Kells in A}ncrican Anthropologist for January; 1892.) Takiioma, see Mount Rainier.

Taea Point, at the entrance to Tort Pudow, in the northeastern l):irt of jefferson County. It was hrst charted by the Wilkes ICxpe-(lition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIll., Atlas, chart 78.) the Indian war broke out in 1855, the white people left the bay and Mr. Dehn sold his mill to J. L. Perkins, he to Milas Galliher, the last owner being I'rank Spinning. For several years prior to 1864, the south side of the ba\' was deserted. On Christmas day of 1864, Job Carr settled there. His family are often counted the first settlers of Tacoma. In 1868, General McCarver arrived looking for a townsite that would serve as the terminus of the proposed Northern Pacific Railroad. He bought most of Job Carr's claim and acquired other lands. He had financial associates in Portland. The fifst plat of the proposed town bore the name "Commencement City," a name derived from that of the bay. This plat was not tiled of record. On Friday, September 11, 1868, Philip Ritz arrived at the McCarver home. He was gathering information for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company and had heard of General McCarver's proposal to build a town. He wanted to suggest a name. He was enthusiastic about the book The Canoe and the Saddle, by Theodore VV^inthrop, in which it was said the Indians knew Mount Rainier by the name of Tacoma. He was eloquent in advocating that name for the town. Mr. Prosch says sleep was banished from the McCarver home that night and Saturday morning found the family still talking over the new name. (McCarver and Tacoma, page 164.) The associates in Portland accepted General T\icCarver's suggestion that the new name be put upon the plat instead of "Conuiiencement City" and the naming was accomplished. Mr. Prosch says: "The Indian name for the land taken by the Carrs was Chebaulip. None of the citizens heeded that, and as the Indians themselves had little regard for their own nauies, and were always willing to adopt those of the whites instead, Chebaulip was passed and forgotten." (McCarver and Tacoma, pages 162-163.) A later and more extended publication is Tacoma, Its History and Its Builders, A Half Century of Activity, by Herbert Hunt, published in Chicago in V)\(\ Mr. Hunt devotes pages 134 to 141 to a discussion of tlie name. It does not dilTer materially in results from the record of Tiiomas W. I'rosch. However, he says (page 135): "That it was lav(H-ably received may be assumed from the fact that Anthony Carr, M. M. McCarver, I(,"iin W. Ackerson and C. P. berry each has claimed the honor of appb, ing it to 'Chebaulip'." The author examines each of the claims carefully and also calls attention to the facts that a hold in Olympia and a hxlge of Good Templars had each been known bv the name Tacoma some months before it was applied lu the new [owu. Tl-.e.se two names probably emanated from the same book by Theo Tai^uaptea, see Pillar Rock.

Tampico, a village in the central part of Yakima County, probably named by A. D. Elgin, a pioneer settler, after a town in Oregon where he had lived. (John H. Lynch, in Names A4SS. Letter 302.) Taneum Creek, a tributary of the Yakima River in the central part of Kittitas County, first charted as Ptehnum, by IMcClellan in 1853. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume L, pages 377-389, and Map 3.)

Tannum Lake, see Bumping Lake.

Tanwax, a lake and a creek flowing from it as a northern tributary of the Nisqually River in the south central part of Pierce County. Both were charted as "Tanwux" by the Surveyor General in 1857, the same officer changing the names to Tanwax in 1859. (United States Public Documents, Serial Numbers 877 and 1026.) Tareit Creek, a name used in 1853, for a waterway near Baker Bay, in the southwestern part of Pacific County, probably the Baker Slough of present maps. (James G. Swan, NortInvest Coast, pages 243-244.)

TaToosh Island, off Cape Flattery, in the northwestern part of Clallam County, named by the British Captain John Meares in July, 1788, for the "Chief Tatooche" by whom he was welcomed. Evidently the Spanish Captain Quimper tried to honor the same Indian with a different spelling of the name when he charted "Isla de Tutusi." (J. G. Kohl, "Hydrography," in Pacific Railroad Reports, A^olume XII., Part I" chapter xv.) The United States Government maintains an important lighthouse and weather bureau station on the island.

Tatsoeo Point, on Puget Sound, east of Anderson Island, in the west central part of Pierce County, first charted by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 79.)

Tatugii, on the east side of Blake Island in the west central part of Kitsap County. It was named by Captain George Davidson, for the United States Coast Survey in 1858, who wrote: "The eastern point of Blake Island is low and pobly, and called by the natives Tatugh." (United States Public Documcvts, Serial Number 1005, page 448.)

Taunton, a town in the southwestern part of Adams County, nomed by railroad officials after a town in Massachusetts. (H. R. Williams, vice-president of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company, in Names MSS. Letter 589.)

Tayi^or, a town in the central part of King County, founded by the Denny Clay Company in 1893 and named by the Oregon Improvement Company. (Sam Galloway, in Names MSS. Letter 536.)

Tayi^ors Bay, in the northwestern part of Pierce County, "named after old man Taylor, who came to this coast as a sailor on an English ship and settled by this bay. (E. Shellgun, Postmaster at Longbranch, in Names MSS. Letter 103.)

TcHANNON River, see Tucannon River.

Tciiii.-AE:-cuM, see Steilacoom. TcHiNOM Point, see Chinom Point.

Teanaway River, a tributary of the Yakima River in the north central part of Kittitas County, first mentioned in 1853 as "Yannoinse River" by J. K, Duncan, topographer with Captain McClellan. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume L, page 210.)

Teekaeet, see Port Gamble.

Tee-nat-pan-up, an Indian name applied to part of Palouse River.

Tehnam Creek, see Taneum Creek. Te-hoTo-nim-me, see Pine Creek.

Tekiu Point, on the east shore of Hood Canal, in the southwestern part of, Kitsap County, was first charted by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIIL, Atlas, chart 78.)

Tekoa, a town in the northeastern part of Whitman County, has a name taken from the Bible. In 1906, at the request of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, there was prepared a list of place names in Washington supposed to be of Indian origin. The list was published in the Seattle l^imes on October 6, 1906, and in 1907 it was again published in a book, Sketches of IVashingtonians. pnj:cs 5-12. In 1908, the list was issued as a pamphlet by the Hyatl Fowells School. In all these printings the name of Tekoa was given as an Indian word, the information being originally gathered from Tomeo, an Indian of Nespelem, who was sincere in his belief that it was a Palouse Indian word. Arthur M. Johnson, of the Science Department of the Colfax High School, wrote a kindly letter saying an error had been made, and that the village had been named by a woman pioneer who took the word from the Bible. In 1913, Rev. Frederick Tonge, of Davenport, called attention to the fact that the word appears several times in the Old Testament. In the Hebrew, the word means "firm" or "settlement." In a city of Judah, by the name of Tekoa, six miles from Bethlehem and twelve miles from Jerusalem, there lived the Prophet Amos and also the wise woman who interceded with David. (II. Samuel XIV: 2-20.) Telford, a town in the central part of Lincoln County, named on July 4, 1909, for M. A. 1'elford, a prosperous rancher in that vicinity. The railroad tried to change the name to "Fellows" when the road was being constructed. (A. Y. Smith, in Names MSS. Letters 399 and 453.)

Tenalquot Prairie, in Thurston County. The Nisqiially Journal, for March 13, 1849, says: "Sent two Ox tumbrills to Tenalquot with provisions." (Reproduced in the Washington Historical Quarterly for July, 1919, page 206.)

Tenas Ieeihee Island, west of Puget Island in the Columbia River, in the southern part of Wahkiakum County, charted by that name on the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6152. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted it as "Katalamet Island." (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 70.) The Chinook Jargon words Tenas lllihee mean "little place" or "little home."

Tenino, a town in the south central part of Thurston County. George T. Reid, of Tacoma, says: ''Most railroad men claim that the town derived its name from the coincidence that, in numbering the survey stations, this point was numbered 1090, usually spoken of as "ten-nine-o. " I have, however, heard this disputed, some persons claiming it to be an Indian word signifying a fork or crotch." (In Names MSS. Letter 94.) William Farrand Prosser says that when the Northern Pacific Railroad built its line from Kalama to Tacoma in 1872 this place was named Tenino from the Indian word meaning "junction" and adds: "The junction referred to was that of the old military roads. During the Indian war [1855-1856] a military road was constructed from Fort Vancouver up the Cowlitz valley, then over to Fort Steilacoom. Near the farms of Hodgson and Davenport it forked, and a branch ran into Olympia. In the Chinook Jargon the fork was called a tenino." (History of the Puget Sound Country, Volume I., page 248.) Another use of the name is recorded as early as April, 1862, when the Oregon Steam Navigation Company had a steamer so named on the Columbia River. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 87.) J. A. Costello says that in the Nisqually Indian language the name of the particular site of Tenino was Kla-pe-ad-am. (The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)

Tenmile Creek, a small tributary of Asotin Creek in the central part of Asotin County, named by miners because it was ten miles from Lewiston, Idaho, the nearest town in the early days. (Postmaster at Asotin, in Names MSS. Letter 260.) See Anatone. The Indians still refer to the creek as "Anatone." (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 693.)

Tenmile Creek, a small tributary of the Nooksack River, at Ferndale, in the west central part of Whatcom County. It is ten miles from Bellingham and received its name when a small settlement of military was sent there on the old telegraph line road in 1858 for protection from the Indians. (Fred L. Whiting, of Ferndale, in Names MSS. Letter 156.)

Tennant Lake, south of Ferndale, in the west central part of Whatcom County, was named for John Tennant, on whose land the lake is situated. (Fred h. Whiting, of Ferndale, in Names MSS. Letter 156.)

Ter-cha-bus, see Port Orchard.

Termination Point, at the north entrance to Squamish Harbor, Hood Canal, in the northeastern part of Jefferson County, was first charted by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.) The name was evidently used to indicate the northern end of Hood Canal.

Terra Vaughn, see Harper.

Territory of Columbia, see Washington, State of. Texas Rapids, near Riparia, in the Snake River, Columbia and Whitman Counties. A small creek flowing into the Snake River nearby bears the same name. Lewis and Clark, on passing through these rapids on October 13, 1805, pronounced them dangerous but did not give them a name. Elliott Coues, editor of the journals, says that the name of Texas Rapids was in use when he wrote, 1893. (History of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, Volume II., page 629, footnote.)

Thatcher Pass, a waterway between Blakely and Decatur Islands, in the east central part of San Juan County, was, in 1841, made a part of Macedonian Crescent" on the Wilkes Expedition chart. It was changed in 1854 by the United States Coast Survey. See Lopez Sound. A post office on the west shore of Blakely Island is called Thatcher.

The Brothers, a peak with a double summit in the southeastern part of Jefferson County. The elevation is 6,920 feet. (United States Forest Service map of Olympic National Forest, 1916.) The peak was named by Captain George Davidson of the United States Coast Survey, in 1856, in honor of Arthur and Edward Fauntleroy. (Edmond S. Meany: "The Story of Three Olympic Peaks," in the Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume IV., pages 182-186). At the same time he named this peak. Captain Davidson honored other members of the Fauntleroy family. See Fauntleroy Cove, Mount Constance and Mount Ellinor.

The Dalles, the greatest series of obstructions in the Columbia River, which are faced by the southwestern margin of Klickitat County. The obstructions are twelve miles long and the fall of the river there is eighty-one feet at low water and sixty feet at high water. Celilo Falls, at the head of the series of obstructions, has a descent of twenty feet at low water but at high water a boat can shoot over the steep slope. (W. D. layman. The Columbia River, page 329.) The Lewis and Clark expedition passing down these obstructions in October, 1805, and returning in April, 1806, referred to them as "Long Narrows," "Short Narrows," and "Great Falls." The editor of their journals, Elliott Coues, gives an analysis of these names and tells of the later application of the name Dalles. (History of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, Volume III., pages 954-956, footnote.) H. H. Bancroft discusses the word "dalles" and shows that the French once used it for "troughs," "waterways," "or canals," though the modern popular meaning is "pavements" such as are frequently found in cathedrals. He says, further, on the authority of the Dalles Mountaineer of May 28, 1869, "The first voyageurs on their way down the great river of the west found many little dalles, but this was, as they said, Le Grand dall de la Columbia." (Works, Volume XXVIII, page 44, footnote.) In 1853, Theodore Winthrop wrote about the Columbia River; * * where the outlying ridges of the Cascade chain commence, it finds a great, low surface paved with enormous polished sheets of basaltic rock. These plates, Gallice [French] dalles, give the spot its name." (The Canoe and the Saddle, John H. Williams edition, page 212.) In 1826, David Douglas frequently applied the name "The Dalles" to the famous obstructions. (Journal of David Douglas, 1823-1827.) The Henry-Thompson Journals record the name as early as May 19, 1814. (New Light on the Early History of the Greater Northwest, Volume II., page 856.) The historic city, The Dalles, on the Oregon side of the Columbia River has added much to the familiarity of the geographic term. See Cascades, Grand Dalles, Hellgate and John Day Rapids.

The Narrows, where the shores of Puget Sound approach each other in the northwestern part of Pierce County, were named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. The journal of the Expedition mentions the waterway on May 10, 1841, saying:"'* * towards evening anchored just below the narrows leading into Puget Sound." The next day the record says: "This narrow pass seems as if intended by its natural facilities to afford every means for its perfect defense." Later, when the hydrographical monograph was issued the name was invariably capitalized and furthermore it was charted as Narrows in the atlas accompanying the monograph. The reference in the monograph is as follows: "The distance through the Narrows is 4 miles; at its narrowest place it is nearly a mile wide, though from the height of the shores it appears much less." (Narrative, Volume IV, page 304; Hydrography, Volume XXIII., pages 318-320; Atlas, chart 78.) Six years later. Captain Henry Kellett, who changed many of the Wilkes Expedition names, let this one stand, expanded to The Narrows. (British Admiralty Chart 1911.) See also Commencement Bay and Point Defiance.

Theon, a place in the central part of Asotin County, was named for its founder, Daniel Theon Welch, who opened a store there in June, 1880. D. D. Welch platted the townsite on May 15, 1884. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 695.)

The Pointers, the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, game this name to three small islands or rocks of the southeast coast of Blakely Island, San Juan County. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.) Subsequent charts have changed the name. See Black Rock, Lawson Rock and White Rock.

The Sisters, see Sister Islands.
The Tooth, see Tooth.

Thomas, a small town in the southwestern part of King County, was named for John M. Thomas, earliest pioneer settler in the White River Valley. He was born in Nicholas County, Kentucky, on July 8, 1829. He crossed the plains in 1852 and in July, 1853, he came to the White River Valley. He participated in the Indian war of 1855-1856. He served as County Commissioner for the years 1857-8-9. (History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II., page 602.)

Thompson Cove, a small bay on the south coast of Anderson Island, in the west central part of Pierce County, was first mapped and named on the British Admiralty Chart 1947, Inskip 1846. The honor was evidently for Rev. Robert Thompson, chaplain of the Fisgard, a British vessel in Puget Sound in 1846.

Thompson Creek, there are several small streams in Washington bearing this name. The one for which information has been obtained is a tributary of Methow River in the west central part of Okanogan Comity. It was named for George E. Thompson, who vied with his neighbors in telling weird and impossible tales. They carried the practice so far as to have a championship belt. This gave rise to the local name of Liar's Creek, still in use by old timers there. (Guy Waring, of Winthrop, in Names MSS. Letter 291.)

Thompson Rapids, in the Columbia River, below Kettle Falls, in Ferry and Stevens Counties. They were named on Friday, April 21, 1826, by the botanist, David Douglas, who wrote: "This rapid, which nearly equals the Grand Rapids, 150 miles from the ocean, having no name, I called it Thompson's Rapid after the first person who ever descended the whole chain of the river from its source to the ocean." (Journal, 1823-1827, page 165.) The man thus honored was David Thompson, the distinguished geographer of the North West Company of Montreal. A satisfying, biography may be found in the introduction to David Thompson's Narrative of His Explorations in Western America, 1784-1812, edited by J. B. Tyrrell and published by The Champlain Society, Toronto, 1916. The name thus given in 1826 was continued on the Arrowsmith (London) maps as late as 1846, but the name in local use now is Rickey Rapids, after John Rickey, a settler there. (T. C. Elliott, in the Quarterly of the Oregon Historical Society, Volume XV., page 43.) "Grand Rapids" was the name at times.

Thorne, in Skagit County, was homesteaded in 1895, by Woodbury J. Thorne and a post office by that name was established there in 1900. (History of Skagit and Snohomish Counties, page 247.)

Thornwood, a station on the Northern Pacific Railway, in the west central part of Skagit County. The name is in honor of W. J. Thome, a settler in that vicinity. (Noble G. Rice, in Names MSS. Letter 48.)

Thorp, a town in the central part of Kittitas County, was named in honor of Milford A. Thorp, who bought land there in 1885. Mr. Thorp died in March, 1910. (Postmaster at Thorp, in Names MSS. Letter 384.)

Thorp Creek, a tributary of Cle Elum River, in the north-western part of Kittitas County, was probably named for the same man as was the town of Thorp.

Thrall, a town in the southeastern part of Kittitas County, was named in honor of an official of the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1889. (M. T. Simmons, in Names MSS. Letter 468.)

Three Brothers Mountain, in the southern part of Chelan County, between Ingalls Creek and the head of Negro Creek, was named for the triple summit. The elevation is given as 7,370 feet. (Henry Landes, A Geographical Dictionary of Washington, page 277.)

Three Finger Mountain, in the north central part of Snohomish County, was named because the peaks resemble three fingers. (Charles E. Moore, in Names MSS. Letter 193.) Three Forks, see Pullman.

Three Lakes, a town in the west central part of Snohomish County, is near three lakes, Panther, Flowing, and Storm. In addition to this descriptive quality, the name is said to have been given in honor of a town by that name in Wisconsin, by John Lauderyon in 1903. (A. C. Campbell, in Names MSS. Letter 247.)

Three Spits, see Bangor.
Three Tree Point, see Point Pully.

Thurston County, was created on January 12, 1852, while Washington was still a part of Oregon Territory, and was named in honor of Samuel R. Thurston, Oregon's first Delegate to Congress. Elwood Evans wrote: "At that session, several new counties were established. The northern part of Lewis was set off. When reported, the act contained the name of 'Simmons,' in honor of the pioneer settler (Michael Troutman Simmons) in the Puget Sound basin; that name gave place to Thurston, a legislative tribute to the memory of the first delegate." (History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume I., page 326.)

Tieton River, a tributary of the Naches in the west central part of Yakima County was mapped by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, by the Indian name "Shanwappum River." (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 67.)

Tiffany Mountain, in the central part of Okanogan County, elevation 8,275 feet, was named for Will Tiffany. There were three Tiffany boys, who, with associates, maintained a camp for about two years in a meadow at the foot of the mountain. They were all rich men's sons, the Tiffany boys being closely related to the famous New York jewelers. Will Tiffany was one of Roosevelt's Rough Riders and lost his life in Cuba during the Spanish-American war. (Letter from C. H. Lovejoy to Frank Putnam, of Tonaskct, dated April 6, 1916, in Names MSS. Letter 345.)

Tiflis, a town in the southeastern part of Grant County, was named after the Trans-Caucasian town, some of the settlers having come from that region. (H. R. Williams, Vice President of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company, in Names MSS. Letter 589.)

Tiger, a town in the central part of Pend Oreille County, was named for George Tiger, one of the oldest settlers there. (Postmaster at Tiger, in Names MSS. Letter 417.)

Tilton River, a tributary of the Cowlitz River in the central part of Lewis County, was undoubtedly named for James Tilton, Surveyor General of Washington Territory, in 1857.

Tinkham Peak, in the east central part of King County, was named by The Mountaineers on June 15, 1916. "Abiel W. Tinkham, under orders from Governor Isaac L Stevens, made a reconnaissance through Snoqualmie Pass on snowshoes with two Indians in January, 1854, a few days after Captain George B. McClellan, who had been entrusted with the same duty by Governor Stevens, had failed in the attempt." (Recommendations of the Mountaineer Trustees to the United States Geographic Board, a copy of which is in Names MSS. Letter 580.) The elevation of the peak is 5,356 feet.

Titusi Bay, see Filuce Bay.
Titsuville, see Kent.

Tiye Point, at the southern entrance to Filuce Bay, in the northwestern part of Pierce County, was mapped first by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 79.)

Tlee-ai.-um Lake, see Cle Elum.

Toad Lake, in the west central part of Whatcom County, was named by George Nolte, on August 1, 1884, "on account of a great number of toads." (Hugh Eldridge, in Names MSS. Letter 136.)

Toandos Peninsula, near the head of Hood Canal, in the east central part of Jefferson County, was first mapped by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.) The name is undoubtedly of Indian origin as were most of the other names given at the same time in that locality. In this case the word may have been derived from Twana, a tribal name of the Indians of that region.

Tocosos River, flowing into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, just east of Neah Bay, in the northwestern part of Clallam County. In 1847, Captain Henry Kellett mapped it as "Okho River." (British Admiralty Chart 1917.) The United States Coast and Geodetic Chart 6300 shows the name Tocosos River.

Toe Point, the east cape of Patos Island, in the north central part of San Juan County. The name is descriptive and was first mapped on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Toke Point, on the north shore of Willapa Bay, in the northwestern part of Pacific County, was named for an Indian chief. Early maps confused this point with Cape Shoalwater, but the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6185 establishes both with accuracy, showing Cape Shoalwater at the ocean front and Toke Point about five miles to the eastward within the bay. James G. Swan in 1857 described the chief as follows: "Toke had been a man of a great deal of importance among the Indians, but advancing years and an inordinate love of whisky had reduced him to being regarded as an object of contempt and aversion by the whites and a butt for the jests and ridicule of the Indians. But, when the old fellow was sober, he was full of traditionary tales of prowess, and legends of the days of old. He was also one of the best men in the Bay to handle a canoe, or to show the various channels and streams; and often afterward I have called his services into requisition and have always found him faithful and efficient. His wife Suis was a most remarkable woman, possessing a fund of information in all matters relative to incidents and traditions relating to the Bay, with a shrewdness and tact in managing her own affairs uncommon among the Indian women." (Northwest Coast, pages 33-34.) In recent years Toke Point has gained prominence through the oyster fisheries.

Tokeland, a town on the eastern shore of Toke Point, derives its name from the Point.

Toledo, a town on the Cowlitz River, in the south central part of Lewis County, was named for a steamboat. August Rochon and his wife, Celeste Rochon owned the land. The Kellogg Transportation Company operated on the river a boat named Toledo. In 1879, Orrin Kellogg arrived from Portland on the boat and bought one acre of land on which to build a warehouse and docks. The Rochons gave a dinner at which Mr. Kellogg, Mr. Caples and Mr. Hillaire Nallette were guests. Mr. Kellogg asked Mrs. Rochon to name the new town and she promptly chose the name of the boat. (R. W. Bell, in Names MSS. Letter 373.)

Toliva Shoal, off the south shore of Fox Island in the south central part of Pierce County, was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.) The British Admiralty Chart 1947, Inskip, 1846, changed the name to "Scarboro Shoals," but the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6460 has retained the original name, Toliva Shoal.

Tolt River, a tributary of the Snoqualmie River, in the north central part of King County, derived its name from the Indians. A town on the river was authorized by the Legislature in 1917 to change its name from Tolt to Carnation in honor of the large establishment maintained there by the Carnation Milk Products Company. The Surveyor General's Map of Washington Territory, in 1857, shows the stream as ''Tolthue River." (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 877.) On September 3, 1919, a party of Indians, including relatives of the great Snoqualmie Chief Patkanim, visited the writer at the University of Washington to urge the erection of a monument to the memory of the chief who had signed the treaty with the white men and had fought for them against the hostiles in the Indian war of 1855-1856. One of the party was Susie Kanim, last surviving child of the chief. She was born at a place they called H'lalt her father's principal home. It was on the present site of Tolt, or Carnation. Their pronunciation of the Indian word sounds much like the one the white man has been using for the same place.

Tom-ma-luke, an Indian name for the place where the Rattlesnake Creek flows into the Yakima River, near the central part of Benton County, is mentioned in the two treaties made in June, 1855, by Governor Isaac I. Stevens with the Yakima and Walla Walla tribes,

Tomar, on the bank of the Columbia River, in the southern part of Benton County, was named for the second grand chief of the Walla Walla tribe. (L. C. Gilman, President of the Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway Company, in Names MSS. Loiter 590.)

Tonasket, a small stream flowing into the Okanogan River near the foot of Osoyoos Lake, in the north central part of Okanogan County, and a town about fifteen miles southward on the Okanogan River, both received the name from Chief Tonasket, sometimes spelled Tonascutt. (Julian Hawthorne, History of Washington, Volume II., page 538.)

Tongue Point, a descriptive name for the east cap of Crescent Bay, in the northern part of Clallam County, was first mapped by Captain Henry Kellett in 1847. (British Admiralty Chart 1911.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, applied the same name to the cape at the entrance to Drayton Harbor, in the northwestern part of Whatcom County, but the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6399 shows that point as Semiahmoo. Lieutenant Broughton in 1792 applied the same name to a point on the south bank of the Columbia River, near Astoria. The United States Coast and Geodetic Sui*vey Chart 6151 shows that the original name has remained.

Tono, a town in the south central part of Thurston County, was named by officials of the Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company. It is claimed that the word came from "ton of coal" and was chosen for its brevity as it would have to be written many times daily by the station agent. (Postmaster at Tono, Names MSS. Letter 245.)

Tooth, a descriptive name applied to a peak near Snoqualmie Pass, in the Cascade Mountains, in the east central part of King County, was variously referred to as "Denny Horn" and "Denny Tooth." (Recommendations of the Mountaineers Trustees to the United States Geographic Board, June 15, 1916, a copy of which is in Names MSS. Letter 580.)

Toppenish, a creek and a town near the central part of Yakima County, derived their names from the Indian word Qapuishlema, meaning "people of the trail coming from the foot of the hill." (Handbook of American Indians, Volume II., page 785.) In 1853, Captain George B. McClellan used a variant of the word by calling part of the creek "Sahpenis." (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume I., pages 377-389.) The same surveyors gave part of the creek the name "Pisko," which was continued by James G. Swan in 1857 and the Surveyor General of Washington Territory in 1859. (Northwest Coast, map; and United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1026.) The Bureau of American Ethnology says Pisko means "river bend" and was the name of a Yakima band having on the Yakima River between Toppenish and Setass Creeks. (Handbook of American Indians, Volume II., page 263.)

Totten Inlet, a southwestern extremity of Puget Sound, locally known as "Oyster Bay," was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Midshipman George M. Totten, who explored it for the expedition. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 79.)

Touchet, a tributary of the Walla Walla River and a town at its mouth, in the southwestern part of Walla Walla County, was spelled "Toosha' by Rev, Gustavius Hines, the Methodist missionary, when he wrote on Saturday, May 27, 1843, as follows: "Travelled fourteen miles and camped for the Sabbath on a branch of the Walla Walla River called Toosha, near its mouth." (Exploring Expedition to Oregon, page 185.) "Gambler's River was the name given by Lewis and Clark [1805-6] to what is now Coppei Creek and White Stallion to the main Touchet." (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 278.) The name was changed before Mr. Hines made his Journey in 1843, and was referred to with the present form of spelling in 1853 by Lieutenant A. W. Tinkham. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume I., page 377.) The town was platted by John M. Hill on April 12, 1884. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 166.) Dayton was once known as Touchet.

Toutle River, a tributary of the Cowlitz River, may have derived its name from Indians referred to by Lewis and Clark on March 27, 1806. They wrote of the Cowlitz River as "Coweliskee" and continuing: "On the same river, above the Skilloots, resides the nation called Hullooetell, of whom we learnt nothing, except that the nation was numerous." (Journals, Elliott Coues edition. Volume III, page 911.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, first charted the present name of Toutle River. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 67.) The railroad surveyors, in 1853, showed the river as "Seh-quu." (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XI, Part II., chart 3.) The Bureau of American Ethnology says Sekwu is the Klickitat name of a village at the forks of the Cowlitz River, presumably belonging to the Cowlitz tribe. (Handbook of American Indians, Volume II, page 500.) The present name of the river was restored in 1856. (Preston's Map of Oregon and Washington West of the Cascade Mountains. "Subsequent maps have shown the name as Toutle River although old settlers use the local name of "East Fork of the Cowlitz." (Mrs. E. B. Huntington, of Castle Rock, in Names MSS. Letter 158.) For years, Silver Lake, six miles northeast of Castle Rock, was known as "Toutle Lake." A town on the river, in the central part of Cowlitz County wears the name of Toutle.

Towal, a town on the north bank of the Columbia River, in the south central part of Klickitat County, derives its name from an Indian chief. (L. C. Oilman, President of the Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway Company, in Names MSS. Letter 590.)

Towarnahiooks, an Indian name for Deschutes River.

Tracy Point, on Loon Lake, in the southeastern part of Stevens County, is interesting to visitors because the famous outlaw, Harry Severence Tracy, lived there before he turned out bad. He cut cord wood for a living and cleared much land. (Evan Morgan, in Names MSS. Letter 109.)

Tracyton, a town on Dyes Inlet, in the central part of Kitsap County, was named in honor of Benjamin Franklin Tracy, who was Secretary of the Navy, under President Harrison, from 1889 to 1893. (E. E. Riddell, Postmaster at Tracyton, in Names MSS. Letter 39.)

Trafton, a neighborhood and former post office in the northwestern part of Snohomish County. In 1889, George Esterbrook acquired the claim on which the former post office "Glendale" was located. Confusion with places similarly named caused him to coin a new name, using Trafalgar (Indiana) as a base. The Trafton post office is discontinued, mail going on a rural route from Arlington, but the name Trafton continues in use for the locality. (Dr. W. F. Oliver, of Arlington, in Names MSS. Letter 196.)

Tr-cha-duk, an Indian name for the site of the present Navy Yard, Puget Sound. (J. A. Costello, The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)

Tree Bluff, the descriptive name of a bluff on the Strait of Juan de Fuca, in the north central part of Clallam County, was first mapped by Captain Henry Kellett in 1847. (British Admiralty Chart 1911.)

Triangle Cove, a small bay on the northeast shore of Camano Island, in the east central part of Island County, was given this descriptive name by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 89.)

Triton Head, on the west shore of Hood Canal, in the north central part of Mason County, was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.) A small bay to the north has been named Triton Cove.

Troutdale, a town on Green River, in the southern part of King County, was named by officials of the Northern Pacific Railway Company. (Page Lumber Company, of Eagle Gorge, in Names MSS. Letter 56.)

Truax, a town on Snake. River, in the south central part of Whitman County, was named by officials of the Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company in honor of Major Truax, who had bought the bar on the opposite bank of Snake River. (Postmaster at Bishop, in Names MSS. Letter 61.)

Tsachwasin, see Pe Ell.
Tsa-La-Te-Litch, an Indian name for the present site of Tacoma. (J. A. Costello, The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)
Tsescut-Kut, an Indian name for Dungeness. (J. A. Costello, The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)
Tsill-Ane, an Indian form of the name Chelan.
Tsutsko, see Hazel Point.
Tshinakain, see Chamokane Creek.
Tsooyes, see Waatch River.
Tsu-Tlat-U-Kwat, see Port Townsend.

Tucannon, a tributary of Snake River, in the northwestern part of Columbia County, was called "Kimooenim Creek" by Lewis and Clark on October 13, 1805. (Journals, Elliott Coues edition, Volume II., page 629.) Rev. Gustavus Hines, during his journey of 1843, refers to it as "Tookanan." (Exploring Expedition to Oregon, page 174.) In 1853, the railroad surveyors had difficulty with the name. They spelled it "Tchannon," "Tukanon" and "Two Cannon," and the map artist drew in two cannons. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume I., pages 376 and 536; Volume XI, Part II, chart 3 ; Volume XII, Book I., map.) V. T. Gilbert wrote: "Tu-kan-non is also a Nez Perce word meaning 'abundance of bread-root' or 'bread-root creek.' The root is called 'kowsh'." (Historic Sketches of Walla Walla, Whitman, Columbia, and Garfield Counties, page 89.)

Tu-Che-cub, see Old Man House.

Tukeys Landing, on the east shore of Port Discovery, in the northeastern part of Jefferson County, was named for John F. Tukey, who settled on a farm there is 1852. He was a native of Maine. He died in 1913. (Postmaster at Port Discovery, in Names MSS. Letter 253.)

Tukwila, a town in the west central part of King County, was named when the post office was obtained in 1905. The former name was Garden Station. When asked for a list of acceptable names, Joel Shomaker suggested the Indian word Tuck-wil-la, meaning 'land of hazelnuts." The Post Office Department shortened it and accepted it as it was different from any other name of a post office in the United States. Later Mr. Shomaker became mayor of the town. (Mrs. M. Lutz, Postmistress of Tukwila, in Names MSS. Letter 532.)

Tulalip Bay, near Everett, in the west central part of Snohomish County, derives its name from the Indian word Duh-hlay-lup, meaning a bay almost land-locked, or having a small mouth. (Rev. Myron Eells, in the American Anthropologist for January, 1892; and Dr. Charles M. Buchanan, in Names MSS. Letter 155.) The name was used in its present form in the treaty negotiated by Governor Isaac I. Stevens with the Indians on January 22, 1855. The bay is surrounded by the Tulalip Indian Reservation and the Government maintains a successful Indian school there.

Tumtum, a town on the Spokane River, in the southeastern part of Stevens County, derives its name from the Chinook Jargon word meaning "heart" or "thump, thump." (William J. McDonald, in Names MSS. Letter 175.)

Tumwater, a town near Olympia, in the central part of Thurston County, is the oldest settlement of Americans on Puget Sound. The Indian name for the place was Spa-kwatl, meaning "waterfalls." (J. A. Costello, The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.) The Hudson's Bay Company men called them "Puget Sound Falls" in 1829, and contemplated the building of a sawmill there. (H. H. Bancroft, Works, Volume XXVIII, page 487.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted simply "Falls" but also referred to them as "Shute's River Falls." (Hydrography, Volume XXII., chart 78; Narrative, Volume IV., page 414.) Michael Troutman Simmons was leader of the party of Americans who settled there in 1845. They called the place "New Market," but later changed it to Tumwater. (Elwood Evans, History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II., pages 558-560.) The word comes from the Chinook Jargon and reflects the Indian idea that the sound of falling water is similar to the throb of the heart, which they called tumtum. (Rev. Myron Eells, in American Anthropologist, for January, 1892.) See also Olympia.

Tunnel Creek, a small stream which flows into Coal Creek and that into Keechelus Lake, in the northwestern part of Kittitas County, was named by The Mountaineers on June 15, 1916. (Recommendations to the United States Geographic Board, a copy of which is in Names MSS. Letter 580.)

Turn Island, on the east shore of San Juan Island, in the southwest part of San Juan County, was named ''Point Salsbury" by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.) This was intended as a honor for Francis Salsbury, Captain of the Top, in one of the vessels of the expedition. The "point" was found to be an island at a turn in the channel between San Juan and Shaw Islands and was mapped as Turn Island on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859. The name is retained by American geographers and about a third of a mile eastwardly from the north point of the island is a rock which bares at low tide. This has been named Turn Rock and has been marked for the aid of navigators. (George Davidson, Pacific Coast Pilot, page 555.)

Turn Point, the west cape of Stuart Island, in the northwestern part of San Juan County, was so named because it lies at a turn in Haro Strait. It was first mapped on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Turner, a town in the central part of Columbia County, was named for B. M. Turner, who owned the land and filed the plat of the townsite on January 17, 1902, when the Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company had extended its line from Dayton to that point. (History of Southeastern Washington, page 376.)

Turnours Bay, see Filuce Bay.

Turtle Back Range, on the northwest coast of Orcas Island. San Juan County, was intended as a descriptive name, given on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Tutl-Ke-Teh-Nus, see Strawberry Bay.
Tuton, see Longview.

Tu-Wa-Dad-Shud, the neighboring Indians used this name for the creek running through the land where Tacoma now stands. (J. A. Costello, The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)

Tuxpam River, see Snohomish.
Twality District, see Washington, State of.

Twana, a village on the eastern shore of Mason Lake in the cast central part of Mason County, was named for the Indian tribes occupying the lands adjacent to Hood Canal.

Twin, this descriptive name has been applied geographically about fifteen times or more to rivers, mountains, lakes and rocks. A town bears the name. It is located on the Strait of Juan de Fuca at the mouth of Twin Rivers, in the north central part of Clallam County.

Twisp River, a tributary of the Methow, in the west central part of Okanogan County, was evidently named from some Indian word as the railroad surveyors first spelled it "Twitsp." (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume I., page 383.)

Tye, see Monroe.

Tykel's Cove, two small bays near Olympia in the central part of Thurston County, are locally known as "Big and Little Tykel's." The name was derived from George Tykel, the pioneer who took the upland adjoining as a donation land claim. (George N. Talcott, of Olympia, in Names MSS. Letter 226.)

Tyler, a town in the southwestern part of Spokane County, was formerly known as Stephens and in fact, the precinct is still known by that name. The Northern Pacific Railway officials named their station Tyler and later the name of the post office was changed to correspond. There is a local tradition that the officials had settled a damage claim in Montana and named this place after that claimant. (George Lindsay, in Names, MSS. Letter 241.)

Tyrrell Prairie, in the northeastern part of Thurston County, is locally known as "Hawk's Prairie." It was named for the pioneer, Freeman W. Tyrrell, who was first to settle there in 1851. After Mr. Tyrrell moved away, about 1870, Tyrus Himes, the next oldest settler, refused to have the name changed to "Himes Prairie." George H. Himes says the old name of Tyrrell Prairie should be retained. (In Names MSS. Letter 598.)

Tzee-Sa-Ted Cove, see Pleasant Harbor.
Tzee-tzee-lal-itch, see Seattle.

Washington AHGP | Geographic Names

Source: Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume 8 - 14


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