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Pacific City ~ Pysht River Origin Washington Geographical Names

Pacific City, founded about 1848 on Baker Bay near the mouth of the Columbia River by Dr. Elijah White. Many dupes were victimized in that early attempt at booming western town lots. Captain George Davidson, of the United States Coast Survey, reported in 1858: "Two or three houses on the shore of the bay, and a saw-mill, are all that remain of the settlement once designated as 'Pacific City.'" (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1005, page 400.) In 1915, F. A. Hazeltine, of South Bend, wrote: "There are no vestiges left of the original Pacific City. It has all gone back to nature and there are trees growing on it over a foot in diameter, which have grown since the townsite was abandoned." (Names MSS. Letter 91). Other "Pacific Cities" have been started in the State since that first failure.

Pacific County, named for its ocean boundary. While Washington was still a part of Oregon Territory, this county was created by an act of the legislature dated February 4, 1851.

Pacific Ocean, western boundary of the State. Crossing the Isthmus of Panama in September, 1513, Vasco Nunez de Balboa discovered the ocean which he called "Mar del Sur" or "Sea of the South." In November, 1520, Fernando Magellan, also under the Spanish flag, sailed through the straits which have since borne his name. On sailing into the great sea, he found it calm and bestowed the name of Pacific Ocean. Both names were used for many years. The Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1803-1806 used these names: "Entrance of the Columbia River into the Great South Sea or Pacific Ocean" and again, "the Great Western Ocian, I can't say Pasific, as since I have seen it, it has been the reverse." (Journals of Lewis and Clark, Thwaites edition, Volume III, pages 235 and 262).

Packwood, name of a lake and formerly of a pass through the Cascades, in the east central part of Lewis County. They were honors for William Packwood, a Virginian, who was a pioneer and explorer in Oregon and Washington. He arrived in Oregon in 1844 and three years later settled on Nisqually Flats. Much of his explorations were done in the mountains. (H. K. Hines: History of Washington, pages 889-890, and Olympia Pioneer and Democrat, April 19, 1861.)

Padilla, a town and bay in the west central part of Skagit County. It was named "Seno de Padilla," in 1791, by Captain Francisco Eliza from another part of the Mexican Viceroy's long name. See the items under Guemes and Orcas. (Chark K. in United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1557.) Captain Henry Kellett in 1847, changed the name to Padilla Bay. (British Admiralty Chart, Number 1911.) That name has remained.

Page, a town in the southern part of Franklin County, named for Dan Page, an old resident there. (Peter Klundt, Postmaster, in Names MSS. Letter 27.) There is a station on the Northern Pacific Railway, near Eagle Gorge, King County, by the same name. It was so named for the Page Lumber Company. (Page Lumber Company, in Names MSS. Letter 56.)

Page Creek, a small tributary of the Snake River, in the northern part of Asotin County, named for the man who in 1871 took up the first land claim there. "It goes by the name of Cormier Gulch now. No water in it." (Cliff M. Wilson, of Silcott, in frames MSS. Letter 240.)

Paha, a town in the central part of Adams County. There is a large spring there and Paha is supposed to be an Indian word meaning "big water." (Postmaster at Paha, in Names MSS. Letter 365.)

Pala Island, see Burke Island.
Palat Creek, see Patit Creek.

Palisade, a station on the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, in the north central part of Whitman County, so named ''because it is located on a formation similar to the renowned Palisades of the Hudson." (H. R. Williams, in Names MSS. Letter 589.) Palisades, a town on the Great Northern Railway, in the southern part of Douglas County. The name has reference to the sharp pointed basaltic rocks so characteristically a part of the walls of Moses Coulee, and was bestowed in 1906 by George A. Virtue of Seattle. The same region at the mouth of Douglas Canyon was formerly known as Beulah Land. (Irving B. Vestal, in Names MSS. Letter 80.)

Palin River, see Palux River.

Palmer, a lake and mountain in the north central part of Okanogan County, named for Y. A. Palmer, an early stockman in Okanogan County. (Postmaster at Loomis, in Names MSS. Letter 264.) The same name is used for a railway junction and a mountain in King County, and for a creek and lake in Snohomish County but the origins of those names have not been ascertained.

Palouse, name of a city in the east central part of Whitman County, of a river, falls, rapids, and of a tribe of Indians. It is applied also to a large area of wheat lands in the Southeastern portion of the State. The Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1803-1806, first of white men to visit the region, named the stream "Drewyer's River," after George Drewyer, one of the party. They also gave the name of the tribe of Indians as ''Palloatpallah." (Lewis and Clark Journals, Coues Edition, Volume II, page 630, III, 1070.) The Bureau of American Ethnology publishes a fairly extensive list of names used for the tribe. (Handbook of American Indians, Volume II., page 195.) Canadian members of the Astoria party in 1812 used the name "Pavion" for the river and "Palloatpallah" for the tribe. (Washington Irving: Astoria page 328 and 330.) John Work of the Hudson's Bay Company in October, 1825, used the name "Flag River." (Journal, edited by T. C. Elliott, in Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume V., page 88.) In July, 1826, David Douglas, the botanist, called the tribe "Pelusbpa." (Journal 1823-1827, page 200.) Alexander Ross used the name "Pavilion River" (Oregon Settlers, in Early Western Travels Series, Volume VII., page 208.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, refers to the "Peluse River" and adds: "The falls upon this river are of some note and are called Aputapat, and they will hereafter be an object of interest to travelers in this country." (Narrative, Volume IV., page 466.) One "hereafter" thus mentioned was embraced by W. P. Breeding in 1875 when he "erected a flouring mill and made other improvements, at the same time laying off the town of Palouse City on his land at the falls of Palouse River." (H. H. Bancroft: Works Volume XXIX., page 571, note.) On June 11, 1855, Governor Isaac I. Stevens, in the Nez Perce treaty used the name Palouse River. In discussing the name, N. W. Durham says: "For a grassy expanse the French have the word pelouse; and, a century ago, when French-Canadian voyagers of the fur companies beheld in springtime the wild tumult of bunchgrass hills north of Snake River, they called it the Pelouse country, the grass lands:" (Spokane and the Inland Empire, page 629.)

Palux River, flowing into Willapa Bay in the northwestern part of Pacific County. The name is often spelled "Palix." In the Chehalis language the word means "slough covered with trees" and the name was applied to a division of the Chinook tribe. (Handbook of American Indians, Volume II., page 195.) In 1857, James G. Swan wrote: "The Palux Indians, on the Copa-lux on Palux River." (Northwest Coast, page 211.)

Panama Reef, see Boulder Reef.

Pandora, a station on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the northeastern part of Whitman County. It was named "after Pandora's Box." (H. R. Williams, in Names MSS. Letter 589.)

Pandora Reef, a small reef about three miles east of Green Point near Port Angeles, in the northeastern part of Clallam County. The name appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards 1858-1859, was in honor of the British survey vessel of that name, working with Captain. Kellett in 1847-1849.

Panther Creek, a branch of Wind River, in the south central part of Skamania County. "Mr. B. Tillotson saw a panther on a log over the creek. Called it Panther Creek." (Postmaster at Carson, in Names MSS. Letter 324.)

Paradise, a name much used in the Mount Rainier Park for glacier, river, park, and valley. See items under Mount Rainier. Park, a town on Lake Whatcom in the southwestern part of Whatcom County named in honor of Charles Park, a pioneer of that place. (J. D. Custer, in Names MSS. Letter 209.) Parker's Landing, see Washougal.

Parker Reef, off the north shore of Orcas Island. The name originated with the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, by charting "Parker's Rock." (Volume XXIII, Hydrography, Atlas, chart 77.) The honor was for George Parker, a petty officer with the expedition.

Park Place, see Monroe.
Park Point, see Devil's Head.
Parnell, former name of a town in Grant County. See Hartline.
Parragon Lake, see Pearrygin Lake.
Partridge Point, see Point Partridge.
Pasauks Island, see Bachelors Island.

Pasco, a town near the junction of the Snake and Columbia Rivers, and the county seat of Franklin County. The name was bestowed by Virgil Gay Bogue, Location Engineer of the Northern Pacific Railroad. At that time the place was dusty, hot and disagreeable. He had read of a disagreeable town in Mexico by that name and gave it to the new station with no suspicion that it would become an important county seat and railroad center. (P. W. Dewart, Spokane, in Names MSS. Letter 599.)

Pataha, a village near Pomeroy in Garfield County, on a creek bearing the same name which is a tributary of the Tucannon. The word is Nez Perce and means "brush." There was a dense fringe of brush along the creek. The site was first settled in 1861 by James Bowers, who sold it to his brother-in-law, J. Benjamin Norton, who, in turn sold it in 1867 to A. J. Favor. He platted the town on August 21, 1882. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 545.) The town was formerly known as "Favorsburg" and "Watertown," but the Indian name finally prevailed. Favor was an interesting pioneer who, for a time, drove stage on the Lewiston route. He was known as "Vine" but the newspapers of that day had much fun over his real name. "His parents lived in a small town in Maine and a circus came there for the first time in the history of the place. It was owned by Angevine, June, Titus & Company. Mr. and Mrs. Favor attended in the afternoon and were so well pleased that they named their boy, born on the following day, for the proprietors of the enterprise." (Columbia Chronicle, January 31, 1885.)

Paterson, a town on the north bank of the Columbia River, in Benton County. It was named for Henry Paterson, a pioneer settler. (Postmaster at Paterson, in Names MSS. Letter 356.)

Patit Creek, a tributary of the Touchet River in the central part of Columbia County. Some maps- show it as Palat Creek. The railroad surveyors called Pat-at-te-tah. (Map in Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII., book 1.) It is from the Nez Perce Pat-tit-ta meaning "bark creek." (F. T. Gilbert in Historic Sketches of Walla Walla, Whitman and Garfield Counties, page 389.)

Patos Island, in the northern part of San Juan County. The Spanish word means "ducks." Galliano and Valdes gave the name in 1792. (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1557.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, renamed it "Gourd Island." (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.) In 1874, Captain Henry Kellett restored the Spanish name to the British Admiralty chart and the United States Coast Survey also adopted it in 1854. (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 784, chart 51.)

Patterson Lake, a small body of water west of Winthrop in Okanogan County. It was named after the first settler there, Sam Patterson. (Guy Waring, Winthrop, in Names MSS. Fetter 291.)

Patterson Point, see Gibson Point.

Pattison Lake, in Thurston County. It was named for James Pattison, who, with his wife Jane (Willey) Pattison took up a donation land claim there in the early fifties. (Mrs. George E. Blankenship in Tillicum Tales of Thurston County, page 128.)

Pat-to, said to be an Indian name for Mount Adams.
Pavilion River, see Palouse.

Paxton, a railroad station in the east central part of Adams County. H. R. Williams, Vice-President of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St .Paul Railway Company says, "it was a chance selection." (In Names MSS. Fetter 589.)

Peach, a town on the Columbia River, in the northern part of Lincoln County. It was named for its fine fruit and peach orchards. (Postmaster at Peach, in Names MSS. Letter 159.) Peacock Island, see Hat Island.

Peacock Mountain, in the central part of Okonogan County. It was named for a mine by that name near its summit. "The mine was found in 1885 by a half-breed, whose name I think was John Picard." (C. H. Lovejoy to Frank Putnam of Tonasket, April 6, 1916, in Names MSS. Letter 345.)

Pe-a-kwad, see Shelton.

Peaeles Passage, the waterway between Hartstene and Squaxin Islands in the southeastern part of Mason County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of T. R. Peale, naturalist, who was a member of the expedition. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Peapod Rocks, off the east shore of Orcas Island, in the east central part of San Juan County. They were named on account of their shape by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.) The United States Coast Survey, in 1854, called them "Peapod No. 1" and "Peapod No. 2." (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 784, Chart 51.)

Pearl Island, off the northwest shore of San Juan Island, in San Juan County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. ('Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.)

Pearrygin Lake, near Winthrop, in the west central part of Okonogan County. It was named for Benjamin Franklin Pearrygin who was the third settler in the valley and located on the shore of the lake. (Guy Waring, of Winthrop, in Names MSS. Letter 291.)

Pe Ell, a town in the southwestern part of Lewis County. Edward S. Curtis says white men adopted the name with the mistaken idea that it was an Indian word. "In fact it is an Indian pronunciation of the name of a one-eyed French half-breed, Pierre, who used to pasture horses in this prairie." The real Indian name of the place, he says, is Tsachwasin. (The North American Indian, Volume IX., page 153, note.)

Peloose River, see Palouse.

Pend Oreille, a county in the northwestern corner of the State, which was created by the Legislature on March 1, 1911. A creek and lakes bear the same name. The name originated with the French employees of the Northwest and Hudson's Bay Companies who gave it to Indians who had ornaments hanging or pendant from the ears. A flippant translation in some journals was "Ear Bobs."

Penguin Harbor, the name given by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, to the waterway north of Guemes Island. It has disappeared, being merged in that of Bellingham Channel. See Guemes Island. Penguin Island, see Bare Island.

Penn Cove, on the eastern shore of Whidbey Island, in Island County. It was named by Vancouver in 1792, who says he named it "in honor of a particular friend." He may have referred to one of two grandsons of William Penn, who were then living in England. (Edmond S. Meany in Vancouver s Discovery of Puget Sound, page 165, note.)

Penrith, a town in the southeastern part of Pend Oreille County. It was named by the Great Northern Railway Company. (J. B. Torbet, in Names MSS. Letter 174.)

Peone, a creek, prairie and town northeast of Spokane. The name came from Chief Peone of the Peone Indians. (Postmaster at Mead, in Names MSS. Letter 170.)

Percival Creek, in Thurston County. Thomas Prather says: "My first work upon arrival in Olympia was logging for Captain Percival up the creek which even then and still bears the name of this noted pioneer sea captain." (Mrs. George E. Blankenship: Tillicum Tales of Thurston County, page 137.)

Per-co-dus-chule, see West Point.

Periwee Falls, in Pend Oreille County, near the Canadian boundary. It was named in 1895 by a French Canadian who was hunting and prospecting in that region. (E. O. Dressel, in Names MSS. Letter 51.)

Perkins Prairie, see Buckley.

Perry, a post office in the northwestern corner of Columbia County, established in August, 1881. Daniel Lyons was then postmaster. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 379.)

Perry's Island, see Fidalgo Island.

Philleo Lake, west of Spangle in Spokane County. It was named by T. A. E. Philleo, who owned the land about it. (M. H. Sullivan of Spangle, in Names MSS. Letter 153.)

Phinney, see Clinton.

Pickering Passage, the waterway between Hartstene Island and the mainland in the east central part of Mason County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Charles Pickering, a naturalist with the expedition. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Piedmont, a town on the shore of Lake Crescent, in the north central part of Clallam County. It was named in 1893 by William Dawson on account of its position at the foot of a mountain. (D. A. Christopher, in Names MSS. Letter 252.)

Pierce County, created by the Oregon Territorial Legislature on December 22, 1852, before Congress had created Washington Territory. The name was an honor for Franklin Pierce, who was at that time President-elect of the United States.

Pigeon Creek, see Bachelors Island Slough.

Pilchuck, the name of a creek, a mountain and a town in Snohomish County. The creek was first to be named, the name being a compound from the Chinook Jargon Pil meaning "red" and chuck, "water." The water in the creek has a reddish hue. (E. M. Floyd in Names MSS. Letter 189 and Dr. Charles M. Buchanan in Names MSS. Letters 141 and 155.)

Pildsii Point, see Broad Spit.

Pile Point, on the southwest shore of San Juan Island, in San Juan County. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Pillar Point, in the Strait of Juan de Fuca off the shore in the northwestern part of Clallam County. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 1911, Kellett, 1847, and was mentioned on page 418 of the United States Coast Survey for 1858. (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1005.)

Pillar Rock, in the Columbia River, in the southwestern part of Wahkiakum County. In 1805, Lewis and Clark described the rock without giving it a name. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, shows that the name was well established at that time. Commander Wilkes says: "We ran up the river a few miles, and anchored just below Pillar Rock, and opposite to Waikaikum. Waikaikum belongs to a chief named Skamakewea, and is a large lodge, picketed around with planks. * * * Pillar Rock is called by the Indians Taluaptea, after the name of chief, who in bygone days lived at the falls of the Columbia, and who, having incurred the displeasure of their spirit, called Talapos, was turned into a rock, and placed where he would be washed by the waters of the great river. The rock is twenty-five feet high, and only ten feet square at its top: it is composed of conglomerate or pudding-stone, and is fast crumbling to pieces. I found great difficulty in ascending it." (Narrative, Volume V., page 120.)

Pilot Cove, on the west shore of Admiralty Inlet, in the northeastern part of Kitsap County. Pilot Point, nearby, is now a better known geographic name. Commander Wilkes, in 1841 wrote : "Here we anchored before sunset and I named it Pilot's Cove, from the circumstance of having been here joined by the first officer of the Hudson Bay Company's steamer, commanded by Captain M'Niel, who on hearing of our arrival, kindly sent him down to pilot up the ship." (Narrative, Volume IV., page 303.)

Pinkney City, see Colville.

Pine City, a town in the northern part of Whitman County. Vice-President H. R. Williams of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company says it was a name in local use when the railroad was built. (In Names MSS. Letter 589.)

Pine Creek a tributary of the Walla Walla River in Walla Walla County. N. W. Durham says it is probably the Te-hoto-nim-me of Steptoe. (Spokane and the Inland Empire, page 222.)

Pine Island, in Willapa Bay, Pacific County: Judge James G. Swan in 1857 wrote: "a small sand-islet of some four or five acres in extent, covered with low, stunted pine-trees and beach grass. Some of the oystermen reside on it, as it is near the channel and the oyster beds." (Northwest Coast, page 27.)

Pine Lake, a small body of water east of Lake Sammamish in King County. It was so named on account of a few white pine trees growing nearby. (J. B. Scott, of Monohon, in Names MSS. Letter 499.)

Ping, a town in the northern part of Garfield County. It was named for Robert and Frank Ping who had settled in that vicinity in early days. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 49.)

Ping County, see Columbia County.

Pingston Creek, a tributary of the Columbia River in the north central part of Stevens County. It was named for Captain Alfred G. Pingston who was captain on the Steamer 49 running between Marcus and Death Rapids, B. C, on the Columbia River in 1865. He was shot and killed by accident at the Little Dalles on the Columbia River some twenty miles north of Marcus in 1870. He had settled on the creek and planted an orchard which has survived for more than half a century. (Richard Nagle, in Names MSS. Letter 129.)

Pinnacle Rock, see Fucas Pillar.
Pinnea Creek, see Skamokawa Creek.

Pins, a post office on the Hoh River in the northwestern part of Jefferson County. It was named for an early settler. The office was discontinued about 1907. (John Huelsdonk, of Hoh, in Names MSS. Letter 171.)

Pioneer, see Covello.
Pischous River, see Wenatchee River.
Pisco River, see Toppenish Creek.
Pish-st River, see Fish River.
Piskowish River, see Wenatchee River.
Pitch-pol, see Foulweather Bluff.

Pitt Island and Passage, west of McNeil Island, in the northwestern part of Pierce County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, spells the name of the island with one "t" and does not name the passage. (Hydrography Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 79.) The British Admiralty Chart 1947, Inskip, 1846, calls the island "Enriquita Island" and the waterway, "Crauford Channel." The United States Coast & Geodetic Survey Chart 6460 shows both island and passage bearing the name Pitt.

P'kowitz, said to be one of the Indian names for Mount Baker, Judge James G. Swan says it is compounded of Puk'h meaning "white" and h'kowitz meaning "mountain" both in the Clallam Indian language. (Washington Pioneer Association Transactions, Seattle, 1894, page 100.)

Plain, a post office in the central part of Chelan County. The name was suggested by C P. Rupel and the office was opened for business on November 14, 1913. (C. F. Rupel, in Names MSS. Letter 370.)

Pleasant Harbor, a small bay on the western shore of Hood Canal, in the eastern part of Jefferson County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, gave it the Indian name "Tzee-sa-ted Cove." (Hydrography Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Pleasant Prairie, in the central part of Spokane County. The first settlement there was by Henry Eilenfelt on June 1, 1878. (History of Spokane County, page 282.)

Pleasant View, a town in the northeastern part of Walla Walla County, plotted by W. C. Painter on November 26, 1894. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 167.)

Plomondon Island, see Fisher Island.
Plumper Reef, see West Bank.

Plymouth, a town on the Columbia River in the south central part of Benton County. A rugged basalt rock makes out into the river. The Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway has a tunnel 800 feet long through the rock. The settlers hoped for a town and sought a good name. "Gibraltar" was objected to because it was foreign and inhospitable. The American name of Plymouth was chosen. The Indian name for the locality was Soloosa, which was preferred by A. D. Walker as a name for the town. (In Names MSS. Letter 372.)

Point Adams, on the Oregon side at the mouth of the Columbia River. The name was given by Captain Robert Gray on May 18, 1792. ("Boits Log of the Columbia" in Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume XII., No. 1, January, 1921, page 35.) Later in the same year Vancouver recognized the name, saying: "Point Adams is a low, narrow, sandy, spit of land, projecting northerly into the ocean, and lies from Cape Disappointment, S: 44 E. about four miles distant." (Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume III., page 88.) Captain Gray tried to change the name of Cape Disappointment to "Cape Hancock." See the entry under Cape Disappointment.

Point Alan, also spelled Allan and Allen, see Allen Point. Point Angeles, see Ediz Hook. Point Armstrong, see Point Chehalis.

Point Baaddam, the southeastern cape of Neah Bay, in the northwestern part of Clallam County. Judge Swan in quoted as authority for the statement that the village Baada was abandoned in 1863 by the Indians who moved to Neah. (Bureau of American Ethnology, Handbook of American Indians, Volume I., page 123.)

Point Beals, on the northeast shore of Vashon Island, in the west central part of King County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Artimeus W. Beals, Captain of the Hold, in one of the ships. Many other petty officers were similarly honored in that vicinity. See Quartermaster Harbor.

Point Bolin, in the northern part of Port Orchard, at the entrance to Agate Passage in the central part of Kitsap County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Jacob Bolin, Captain of the Forecastle in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Brown; the North Cape at the entrance to Grays Harbor, in the southwestern part of Grays Harbor County. It was named by Lieutenant Joseph Whidbey, of the Daedalus, part of the Vancouver expedition, in October, 1792, after Captain (later Rear Admiral) Brown of the British Navy. (Vancouver's Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume III., page 133.) Point Carter, see Carter Point.

Point Caution, on the east shore of San Juan Island near Friday Harbor. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Point Chehalis, the south cape at the entrance to Grays Harbor, in the southwestern part of Grays Harbor County. In October, 1792, Lieutenant Joseph Whidbey, while in the Daedalus of the Vancouver expedition, named the north cape after Captain Brown of the British Navy. At the same time he named this southern cape "Point Hanson" after Lieutenant Hanson who had commanded the Daedalus. (Vancouver's Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume III., page 133.) For a number of years this name persisted though sometimes spelled "Harrison." The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted it as "Chickeeles Point," one of the numerous spellings of Chehalis. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 75.) Captain George Davidson discussed all these names in the Report of the United States Coast Survey for 1858, and said that the few settlers in the region called it "Point Armstrong." (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1005.) The name was intended as an honor for Mr. Armstrong who owned a mill on the Chehalis River and who built on the point a house for Dr. Roundtree who intended to found a city and manufacture salt. (James G. Swan, Northwest Coast, page 253.) Since 1857, Point Chehalis, derived from the river and the Indian tribe of that name, has become established.

Point Colville, the southeast cape of Lopez Island, San Juan County. It was undoubtedly an honor for Andrew Colville, Governor in London of the Hudson's Bay Company. It was probably given by Captain Henry Kellett of the British Navy in 1847. It was mentioned in the United States Coast Survey Report for 1854. (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 784.) It appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859. See Colville and Colville Island.

Point Cooper, the cape dividing Budd Inlet from Eld Inlet, in the north central part of Thurston County. Eld Inlet is locally known as "Mud Bay" and this cape is known as "Mud Bay Spit." The official name was given by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of John Cooper, Armorer on one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 79.)

Point Crowlie, the southeast point at the entrance to Annas Bay, at the head of Hood Canal. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, evidently in honor of Charles E. Crowley, lieutenant in the United States Navy, mentioned for gallantry in the Battle of New Oreleans.

Point Cummings, on the west shore of Hood Canal, named in honor of W. H. Cummings, Boatswain's Mate in one of the ships. (Hydrgraphy, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Dalco, at the southwest shore of Vashon Island, in the southwestern part of King County. The charts of the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, do not show the name though it is credited to that source by the United States Coast Survey Report for 1858. (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1005, page 448.)

Point Defiance, in the northwestern part of Pierce County and now embraced in a park of the City of Tacoma. It lies at the boundary between Admiralty Inlet and the original Puget Sound. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, and is frequently referred to in the official publications. In 1849, Commodore Wilkes published a book, Western America, in which is found the following: "This narrow pass [The Narrows] seems as if intended by nature to afford every means for the defense of Puget's Sound, * * * the only entrance to which is through the narrows, which, if strongly fortified, would bid defiance to any attack and guard its entrance against any force." (Western America, page 81.) See also Commencement Bay and The Narrows.

Point Demock, on the northwestern shore of Camano Island, in Island County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of John Demock, Captain of the Top in one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 77.)

Point Disney, the southern point of Waldron Island in the the northern part of San Juan County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Solomon Disney, Sailmaker's Mate in one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 77.)

Point Dougal, see Dougall Point.

Point Doughty, the northwest cape of Orcas Island, San Juan County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of John Doughty, Captain of the Top in one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.)

Point Edmund, just south of Edmonds, in the southwestern part of Snohomish County. The spelling on maps has often been "Edwards." The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, has left no evidence as to the one honored by the name.

Point Ellice, within the mouth of the Columbia River, east of Baker Bay, in the southern part of Pacific County. The Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1803-1806, camped on the lee side of the point and Sergeant Patrick Gass thought it should be called "Blustry Point." (Twaites' Edition of the Journal, Volume III., page 215.) The name was bestowed by the North West Company in honor of Edward Ellice, agent of the company in London, who, with William McGillivray, brought about the union of the Northwest and the Hudson's Bay Companies in 1821. David. Douglas on April 1 1, 1825, recorded it as "Point Ellis." (Journal, 1823-1827, page 56.) That error was repeated by Belcher in 1839, but on May 1, 1833, Dr. William Eraser Tolmie wrote: "At 10 boarded by a party of Chenooks off Point Ellice." (Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume III., page 231.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, also used the correct name. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 68.)

Point Elliott, south of Everett, in the west central part of Snohomish County. The treaty in which the Indians ceded the lands from Seattle to the British line to the United States was signed on January 22, 1855, and became known as the Point Elliott Treaty. Since then the town of Mukilteo has arisen on the point and displaced the old name. Point Elliott was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, probably in honor of Samuel Elliott, Midshipman on one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.) See also Mukilteo.

Point Fosdick, opposite Fox Island, at the northeastern entrance to Hale Passage, in the west central part of Pierce County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Stephen Fosdick, Gunner's Mate on one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Frances, the southwestern cape of Bellingham Bay; Whatcom County. In 1792, Captain George Vancouver named it Point Francis but left no evidence as to whom he thus honored. (Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Puget Sound, page 209, note.) The changed spelling appears on recent charts of the United States and Geodetic Survey.

Point Gibson, see Gibson Point.

Point Glover, south of Bainbridge Island; within the entrance to Port Orchard, in the east central part of Kitsap County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of John Glover, Captain of the Top in one of the ships. (Hydrography Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Gordon, see Restoration Point.

Point Grenville, jutting into the Pacific Ocean, in the west central part of Grays Harbor County. It was named by Captain George Vancouver on April 28, 1792, in honor of Lord William Wyndham Grenville, who was raised to the peerage just before Vancouver sailed on his memorable voyage. (Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Puget Sound, page 64, note.) On some maps the name has appeared as "Greenville" or "Granville." The Spaniards had given the point different names. Bruno Heceta, in 1775, called it Punta de los Martires or "Point of the Martyrs" on account of an attack from Indians. See Destruction Island. In 1792, Galliano and Valdes, in the Sutil y Mexicana, called it Punta de la Bastida or "Point of the Bastion," on account of its fort-like appearance. (J. G. Kohl in Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII, Part I, page 265.)

Point Hammond, the northeast extremity of Waldron Island, San Juan County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Henry Hammond, Quartermaster on one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.)

Point Hancock, see Cape Disappointment.

Point Hannon, the eastern extremity of Hood Head, in the northwestern part of Jefferson County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, but no evidence is available as to the one honored. Point Hanson, see Point Chehalis.

Point Harmon, a name given to the point in Commencement Bay, where now stands the City of Tacoma. The name was an honor given by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, to John Harmon, Captain of the Forecastle on one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Harrison, see Point Chehalis.

Point Heyer, on the east shore of Vashon Island in the western part of King County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Henry R. Heyer, Quartermaster on one of the ships. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Hilcome, see Koitlah Point.

Point Hudson, the two capes of Port Townsend Bay, Jefferson County, were named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Commanders William E. Hudson and Cadwalader Ringgold of the expedition. Point Hudson has retained its name but "Point Ringgold" has been changed to Vancouver's older name, Marrowstone Point.

Point Jefferson, at the north entrance to Port Madison, in the northwestern part of Kitsap County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, honored three former Presidents of the United States in one locality by naming Port Madison, Point Jefferson and Point Monroe at the south entrance to the bay. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Julia, see Port Gamble.
Point Kanawi, see Basalt Point, and also Olele Point.
Point Komkomle, see Chinook Point.

Point Lawrence, the east cape of Orcas Island, San Juan County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of James Lawrence, famous hero in the United States Navy. (Hydrography, Atlas, chart 77.) See also Guemes Island and Oak Bay, where attempts were made to further honor the same hero.

Point Leadbetter, see Leadbetter Point.
Point Leavett, see Bush Point.
Point Lewis, see Cape Shoalwater, and also North Head.
Point Leoyd, see Upright Head.

Point Lowell, the southwestern cape of Camano Island, opposite Holmes Harbor, Island County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of James Lowell, Captain of the Forecastle in one of the ships. (Hydrography, Atlas, charts 77 and 78.)

Point Migley, the north cape of Lummi Island, in the southwestern part of Whatcom County. It was named in honor of William Migley, Quarter Gunner on one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.)

Point Mill, in Port Discovery, Jefferson County, where S. L. Mastick built the Port Discovery Mill in 1858. It should not be spelled "Nill." (Postmaster at Port Discovery, in Names MSS. Letter 253.) The United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6450 shows it "Point Nill."

Point Monroe, the southern cape of Port Madison, Kitsap County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, as one of three honors conferred in the same locality upon former Presidents of the United States. See also Point Jefferson and Port Madison. Point Moody, see Johnson Point.

Point New, on the east shore of North Bay, six miles west of Hoquiam, Grays Harbor County. It was named in October, 1792, by Lieutenant Joseph Whidbey of the Vancouver Expedition, who says it was named "after the master of the store ship." (Vancouver's Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume III, page 135.)

Point Nill, see Point Mill.

Point No Point, at the northeastern extremity of Kitsap County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.) Commander Wilkes seems to have been disappointed as he drew near the point and by naming it as he did perpetrated what has since been deemed as a sort of geographical joke. An efficient lighthouse has given added importance to the point. Governor Isaac I. Stevens, in making a treaty with the Clallam tribe, cited the place at "Hahdskus, or Point No Point, Suquamish Head." Edward S. Curtis says the Indian name for the place is Hadsks, meaning "Long nose." (North American Indian, Volume IX., page 98.) Captain George Davidson in 1858 recorded the Indian name as Hahd-skus. (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1005.)

Point Partridge, the west central cape of Whidbey Island, in Island County, named by Captain George Vancouver on June 6, 1792. It has long been supposed that the name came from seeing grouse or pheasants. (Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Paget Sound, page 173, note.) More recent researches have revealed the fact that Captain Vancouver's brother John had married into an English family by the name of Partridge and that the honor of this important name was intended for that family. Captain Vancouver died in 1798, before his great journal was published and the dedication was written by John Vancouver. An earlier Spanish name for the point did not survive. Manuel Quimper in 1790 had charted it "Punta de Mendez." (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1557.)

Point Piner, the southern cape of Maury Island in southwestern part of King County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Thomas Finer, Quartermaster in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Polnell, East Cape of Crescent Harbor, Whidbey Island, in Island County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of John Polnell, Quarter Gunner in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 77.)

Point Pully, a cape on the mainland east of Vashon Island and between Fauntleroy Cove and Des Moines, locally known as "Three Tree Point." It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Robert Fully, Quartermaster in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Restoration, see Restoration Point.

Point Richmond, on the mainland west of Vashon Island in the northwestern part of Pierce County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of William Richmond, Boatswain's Mate in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Ringgold, see Marrowstone Point.

Point Roberts, two such names appear in the geographic history of Washington. One has been supplanted by the name of Alki Point, now within the limits of Seattle. That point was charted as "Point Roberts" by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Humphrey Roberts, Armorer in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.) See Alki Point. The other is an older name, given by Captain George Vancouver on June 12, 1792, "after my esteemed friend and predecessor in the Discovery." That entry points directly to Captain Henry Roberts of the British Navy. (Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Puget Sound, page 182 and note.) Its location gives it peculiar prominence, lying at the end of a peninsula across which runs the international boundary. The point thus becomes the northwestern extremity of Whatcom County. The point attracted the attention of the Spanish explorers. Captain Eliza, in 1791, thought it an island and called it "Isla de Zepeda" and Captains Galliano and Valdes, in 1792, called it "Punta Cepeda." One other form of the Spanish word was "Cesseda." (United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1557, charts K. and L. and Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII., Part I, chapter XV, page 305.)

Point Robinson, see Robinson Point.
Point Salsbury, see Salsbury Point.

Point Sandford, on the west shore of Vashon Island, in the southwestern part of King County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Thomas Sandford, Quartermaster on one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Sares, see Langley Point.
Point Scabock, see Seabeck.

Point Southworth, on the mainland, opposite the north end of Vashon Island, in the southeastern part of Kitsap County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Edward Southworth, Quartermaster in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Tala, at the east entrance to Port Ludlow, in the northeastern part of Jefferson County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, with no evidence being left as to the meaning or origin of the name. . (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Termination, at the northwestern entrance to Hood Canal, near Suquamish Harbor, in the northwestern part of Jefferson County, named for its location by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, charts 78 and 84.)

Point Thompson, the northern cape of Orcas Island, San Juan County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Matthew Thompson, Captain of the Top in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 77.)

Point Totten, see Port Gamble.

Point Treble, the western cape of Anderson Island, in the western part of Pierce County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, for George Treble, a seaman in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.) An attempt was made to change this name to "Richard Point," probably as an honor for Fleetwood J. Richards, Lieutenant of Marines on the British frigate Fisgard, which was in Puget Sound prior to the treaty of 1846. (British Admiralty Chart 1947, Inskip, 1846.)

Point Turner, at the entrance to Port Washington Narrows, where stands the present City of Bremerton, Kitsap County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Henry Turner, Captain of the Forecastle in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Vancouver, on the Columbia River in the southeastern corner of Clarke County, named by Lieutenant W. R. Broughton, October 30, 1792, in honor of Captain George Vancouver, under whom he was then serving. (Vancouver's Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume III, page 107.) Local confusion of locality was cleared up on October 30, 1916, by T. C. Elliott, who identified this point with the locally known Cottonwood Point. (The Quarterly of the Oregon Historical Society, Volume XVIII, pages 73-82.) "

Point Vashon, the north cape of Vashon Island, in the western part of King County, named from the island by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Wells, on the east shore of Admiralty Inlet in the southeastern corner of Snohomish County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of William Wells, Yeoman in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point White, southwest extremity of Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of James White, Captain of the Forecastle in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Whitehorn, see Whitehorn Point.

Point William, at the southern entrance to Bellingham Bay, near Samish, in the northwestern part of Skagit County, named on June 23, 1792, in honor of Sir William Bellingham. (Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Puget Sound, page 209.) See Bellingham. It had been named "Punta de Solane" by the Spanish explorer Eliza. (J. G. Kohl in Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII., Part I., chapter xv, page 302.)

Point Williams, north of Fauntleroy Cove, in the western part of King County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Samuel Williams, Gunner's Mate in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.)

Point Wilson, at Port Townsend, in the northeastern extremity of Jefferson County, named by Captain George Vancouver on June 6, 1792, who wrote: "After my much esteemed friend Captain George Wilson of the navy." (Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume II., page 174.) The Indian names were Kam-kam-ho in the Chimacum language and Kam-kum in the Clallam. (J. A. Costello: The Siwash, Seattle 1895.)

Point Wilson, a second point with this name is located on the southeast shore of Hartstene Island, in the southeastern part of Mason County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Thomas Wilson, Sailmaker's Mate in one of the crews. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 79.)

Polly, see Felida.

Pomeroy, county seat of Garfield County. Joseph M. Pomeroy, born in Ashtabula, Ohio, on March 20, 1830, migrated to Illinois in 1850, to Oregon in 1852 and to Washington in 1863. He had charge of a stage station and ranch at what is now Dayton, and on December 8, 1864, purchased from Walter Sunderland the ranch on which he platted the town of Pomeroy on May 28, 1878. (History of Southeastern Washington, pages 500-501, 533.)

Pomona, a station on the Northern Pacific Railway seven miles north of Yakima in Yakima County. In 1916 Edmund T. Stevens, operator, wrote that as passengers, freight and express intended for Selah, also known as Wenas, were landed at this new station of Selah, he suggested as a new name that of the Roman Goddess of Fruit Trees, which was done on November 22, 1908. (In Karnes MSS. Letter 289.)

Porpoise Rocks, off the southeast shore of Guemes Island in the northwestern part of Skagit County. They were named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, probably after the brig of that name in the squadron. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 92.) The names have been changed to Dot, Huckleberry and Saddlebag Islands.

Port Angeles, county seat of Clallam County. The name originated with the Spaniards in 1791, Captain Francisco Eliza named the peculiar harbor "Porto de Nuestra Senora de los Angeles;" in 1792, Captains Galliano and Valdes contracted it to "Porto de los Angeles." Captain Vancouver shortened it still further in 1792 and gave the form now in use. In 1852, the United States Coast Survey charted it as "False Dungeness" from its resemblance to New Dungeness nearby. The long sandspit which makes the harbor is called Ediz Hook, probably from Yennis, Clallam Indian word, meaning "good place." See Ediz Hook.

Port Blakely, see Blakely.

Port Columbia, a post office on the Columbia River in the northwestern part of Douglas County, named by a Chicago salesman who enjoyed his vacation there in 1888. (Postmaster at Port Columbia, in Names MSS. Fetter 565.)

Port Discovery, near Port Townsend in the northeastern part of Jefferson County, named by Captain George Vancouver on May 2, 1792, after his ship. (Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume II., page 66.) The Spaniards sought to honor one of their heroes. Manual Quimper in 1790 charted the harbor as "Porto de la Bodega y Cuadra," which was cut down by Captain Eliza in 1791 to "Porto de Quadra." (Charts reproduced in United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1557.) The Indian names of the place are given as Skwa-kwe-i in the Clallam language and Kui-la-tsu-ko in the Chimacum language. (J. A. Costello: The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)

Port Gamble, a harbor and town near the entrance to Flood Canal in the northeastern part of Kitsap County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Lieutenant Robert Gamble, who was wounded by the bursting of the bow gun on the United States frigate President during his famous battle with the Belvidere on June 23, 1812. Wilkes also named the capes at the entrance to the bay Point Totten and Point Julia. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 83.) The Totten name was in honor of Passed Midshipman George M. Totten in one of the crews. The name is now displaced by that of the town of Port Gamble. There is no evidence as to the origin of the name Point Julia. The United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6450 shows at that place "Indian Village." At the present site of Port Gamble, Josiah P. Keller founded a village in the fall of 1853 and called it "Teekalet." (PI. PI. Bancroft: Works, Volume XXXI., page 18, note.) The name "Teekalet" was used on many early maps. Rev. Myron Eells says the Indian word means "brightness of the noon-day sun," because the sun at noon shines with peculiar splendor on the sands of the bay. (In American Anthropologist, January, 1892.) In 1857, Judge James G. Swan said: "There are now about thirty-seven saw-mills in the Territory, the largest of which is that of Pope, Talbot & Co., under charge of Captain J. P. Keller at Teekalet (Port Gamble) on Hood's Canal." (Northwest Coast, page 399.) His use of parentheses shows the change toward the name of Port Gamble.

Port Gardner, what is now Saratoga Passage and including also part of Everett Harbor, in the western part of Snohomish County, was named Port Gardner by Vancouver on June 4, 1792, in honor of Vice Admiral, Sir Alan Gardner of the British Navy. (Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume II., page 170.) To the southern cape of Camano Island he gave the name of Point Alan in honor of the same man. See Allen Point, Everett and Port Susan.

Port Hadlock, see Hadlock.
Port Lawrence, see Oak Bay and also Guemes Island.

Port Ludlow, a town near the entrance to Hood Canal in the northeastern part of Jefferson County, named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Lieutenant Augustus C. Ludlow, of the United States Navy, who was killed on the Chesapeake in her famous duel with the Shannon. (J. G. Kohl in Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII., Part I, chapter xv, page 283.) The Indian names are given as Sna-nul-kwo in the Chimacum language and Dos-la-latl in the Twana or Skokomish language. (J. A. Costello: The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)

Port Madison, a bay, town and Indian reservation on the north end of Bainbridge Island, in the northeastern part of Kitsap County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of the former President of the United States. The bay was surveyed and named on May 10, 1841. (Narrative, Volume IV., page 304.) Two other Presidents were honored in the same vicinity. See Point Jefferson and Point Monroe. Governor Stevens in the treaty of January 22, 1855, records the Indian name of the place at Noo-sohk-um. John Work, of the Hudson's Bay Company, had on November 8, 1824, recorded the name as "Soquamis Bay." (Washington Historical Quarterly, July 1912, page 213 and note by T. C. Elliott.) This last name is that of the Suquamish tribe, whose Chief, Seattle, had his principal home there. That home was a large communal house and this, in turn, gave rise to a local pioneer name for the place, "Oleman House."

Port Nunez Gaona, see Neah Bay.

Port Orchard, the county seat of Kitsap County, takes its name from the inlet, on the opposite shore of which is located the Navy Yard Puget Sound. It was named on May 24, 1792, by Captain Vancouver in honor of H. M. Orchard, Clerk of the Discovery, who while walking on the beach had found that the supposed cove was really an extensive inlet. (Meany's Vancouver s Discovery of Puget Sound, pages 134-135, and note.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, surveyed the harbor and honored members of the crews by giving their names to subdivisions of the harbor and to points along the shores. Many of these names have remained. See Sinclair Inlet, Dye's Inlet, Ostrich Bay, Point Glover, Point White, and Point Turner. The Indian name of Port Orchard is given as Ter-cha-bus in the Duwamish language. (J. A. Costello: The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)

Port Quadra, see Port Discovery.

Port Susan, the waterway between Camano Island and the mainland, forming part of the boundary between Snohomish and Island Counties. On June 4, 1792, it was named by Captain Vancouver in honor of Lady Gardner. (Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Paget Sound, pages 167-171.) As to further honors for the same family, see Allen Point and Port Gardner.

Port Townsend, the county seat of Jefferson County and the extensive bay on which it is located, named by Captain Vancouver on May 8, 1792, who wrote: "in honor of the noble Marquis of that name." (Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume II., page 76.) The "h" in the original name of Townshend was dropped by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, charts 77, 78 and 82.) It was restored on the British Admiralty Chart 1911, Kellett, 1847. Four years later an American settlement by A. A. Plummer, Charles C. Bachelder, L. B. Hastings and W. F. Pettygrove named their town "after the bay on which it was situated, Port Townsend." (PI. H. Bancroft: Works, Volume XXXI., pages 19-20.) Since then American maps and writings have omitted the "h." Theodore Winthrop in 1853 mentioned "Kahtai, Port Townsend," thus indicating an Indian name for the place. (The Canoe and the Saddle, Williams edition, page 4.) J. A. Costello says that in the Clallam language the name is Ka-tal and, in the Chimacum language, Tsutlat-u-kwat. (The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.) The pet name of Port Townsend is "Key City." (Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, page 84.)

Port Williams, a town on the coast southeast of Dungeness, in the northeastern part of Clallam County, named for a contractor who began the settlement. (J. M. Ward, in Names MSS. Tetter 206.)

Portage, the connecting strip between Vashon Island and the peninsula, wrongly called Maury's Island, in the southwestern part of King County. (George Davidson: Pacific Coast Pilot, page 613.) Many differences between north and south tribes of Indians were settled there. When white settlers came they easily transported small boats over the low strip of land which gave rise to the name of Portage. (Charles F. Van Olinda, in Names MSS. Letter 440.)

Portage: Bay, the northeastern arm of Lake Union, Seattle, It was named by the Port Commission because in pioneer days coal trains were portaged over the narrow land from Lake Washington to Lake Union. See items under Lake Union, Lake Washington and Lake Washington Canal.

Porter, a creek and town in the southeastern part of Grays Harbor County, both named in honor of Fairchild Porter, who settled there about 1860. (Postmaster at Porter, in Names MSS. Letter 183.)

Possession Point, the southeastern extremity of Whidbey Island, at the entrance to Possession Sound, which indicates the source of the name on the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6450. Locally it is known as Skagit Head. (Pacific Coast Pilot, page 597.) This gives rise, to confusion with Skagit Head.

Possession Sound, waterway between the southeastern shore of Whidbey Island and the mainland and constituting most of the Harbor of Everett, Snohomish County. The name was given on June 4, 1792, by Captain Vancouver, who their celebrated the birthday of George III., took possession and called the country New Georgia. (Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Puget Sound, pages 167-171.) The Daughters of the American Revolution have commemorated this historic event by placing a bronze tablet in Everett. See Port Gardner, Port Susan and Everett.

Potlatch, a town on the southwest shore of Hood Canal, in the central part of Mason County. The name is from the Chinook Jargon and means "to give." In primitive times it meant giving all, by which men achieved greatness. Livingston Farrand has called the potlatch a sort of aboriginal savings bank, as an Indian who "made potlatch" could expect good will and favors from all who partook of it, and also a sort of clearing house or public debt-paying device. (Basis of American History, pages 113-114.)

Poulsbo, a town at the head of Liberty Bay, in the north central part of Kitsap County. It was first settled by Norwegians, the family of Jargen Eliason being first, in September, 1883. The next was I. B. Moe, who was the first signer of a petition for a post office. He suggested Poulsbo for the name in honor of a small place near his home in Norway. (E. J. Eliason, in Names MSS. Letter 570.)

Poverty Cove, see Neah Bay.

Powahkee Creek, a tributary of the Snake River, in the northern part of Asotin County, named for a Nez Perce Indian woman who took up a claim there. (Cliff M. Wilson, in Names MSS. Letter 240.)

Powwow Creek, a tributary of the Columbia River, at Fruitland, in the southwestern part of Stevens County, shown on the maps as Alder Creek. The local name comes from the fact that Indians formerly held their councils or powwows there. (Mrs. Anna J. Thompson, postmistress at Fruitland, in Names MSS. Letter 128.) See Alder Creek and Fruitland.

Prairie, a town in the northwestern part of Skagit County, named for its location.

Prairie Mountain, east of Darrington in the northeastern part of Snohomish County, named because of the beautiful prairie at its base. (Charles E. Moore, of Darrington, in Names MSS. Letter 193.)

Pratt, see Denison.

Prescott, a town in the central part of Walla Walla County, named in 1881 in honor of C. H. Prescott, General Superintendent of the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company. At that time the company made Prescott a railway division with machine shops, etc., which were soon afterward moved to Starbuck. (R. B. Smith, in Names Mss. Letter 480.) The town of Prescott was platted May 12, 1882; by the Oregon Improvement Company. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 166.) The first settlement on the site was by Rev. H. H. Spalding in 1859. (History of Walla Walla County, page 143.) Great trouble with freights was caused by the same name being given to a water-tank station on the tide flats at Tacoma. It required seventeen years (1893 to 1910) of complaints and correspondence to change the name of the water tank station. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer. February 23, 1910. President Channel, between Waldron and Orcas Islands, in the northern part of San Juan County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, named San Juan Island "Rodgers Island" in honor of John Rodgers, Captain- of the United States frigate President, who encountered the British Little Belt just before the War of 1812 and later fired the first shot in that war. To intensify the honor, the waterway east of "Rodgers Island" was named "Presidents Passage" and the south entrance was named "Little Belt Passage". (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 77.) Captains Kellett, 1847, and Richards, 1858-1859, restored Spanish names to the Islands and named the "President's Passage", "Middle Channel" and the waterway between Waldron and Orcas Islands was named "Douglas Channel". (British Admiralty Chart 2689.) This honor was for Sir James Douglas, at that time Governor and Commander-in-chief of Vancouver Island. (John T. Walbran, British Columbia Coast Names, page 149.) The United States Coast and Geodetic Survey has changed the "Middle Channel" to San Juan Channel and the "Douglas Channel" to President Channel, thus restoring part of the older Wilkes name. (Chart 6300.)

President Point, on the western shore of Puget Sound, in the northwestern part of Kitsap County. A few miles to the southward, The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, had honored three former presidents by naming Point Jefferson, Point Monroe and Port Madison. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII, Atlas, chart 88.) This fact evidently caused the United States Coast Survey to name President Point in 1856. (George Davidson, Pacific Coast Pilot, page 603.)

Pressentin Creek, a tributary of the Skagit River, in the central part of Skagit County. It was named for Charles von Presentin, who located a home there in 1878. (Postmaster of Birdsview, in Names MSS. Letter 130.)

Preston, a town in the central part of King County, near Issaquah. It was named in 1888 in honor of William T. Preston, who was associated with D. H. Gilman and others in building the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway, which later became a branch of the Northern Pacific Railway. In early days supplies were shipped on horseback from Preston to the prospecting camps of the Seattle Coal and Iron Company. On January 13, 1893, a commission was issued to J. P. Hudson as Postmaster of Preston. J. F. Hudson, in Names MSS. Letter 451.)

Preston Point, in Everett, the southern point at the mouth of the Snohomish River. The Indian name for the point is Hay-bohl-ub. (Charles M. Buchanan, in Names MSS. Letter 155.)

Prevost Harbor, on Stuart Island in the northern part of San Juan County. It was named by Captain Richards of II. M.S. Plumper in 1859, in honor of Captain James Charles Prevost of H. M. S. Satellite. See also Charles Point and James Island. For a biography of Prevost see Captain John T. Walbran's British Columbia Coast Names, page 400.

Price's Valley, see Fruitland.

Priest Point, opposite Everett at the north entrance to the Snohomish River. As seen from Puget Sound, it is a rocky promontory. The Indian name is Schuh-tlakks, meaning stony nose. (Charles M. Buchanan, in Names MSS. Letter 155.) The present name relates to the work of Father Chi rouse at Tulalip. Priest Point, on the east shore of Budd Inlet, near Olympia. The name originated from the early missionary donation claim of Father Pascal Ricard. Through the efforts of Elias J. Payne, thirty acres were secured for a city park, which is called Priest Point Park. (Elias J. Payne, in Names MSS. Fetter 53.)

Priest Rapids, in the Columbia River southwest of Grant County. Alexander Ross, of the Astoria party, writing in 1811, said: "Here a large concourse of Indians met us, and after several friendly harangues, commenced the usual ceremony of smoking the pipe of peace: after which they passed the night in dancing and singing. The person who stood foremost in all these introductory ceremonies, was a tall meagre, middle-aged Indian, who attached himself very closely to us, from the first moment we saw him. Fie was called Fla-que-laugh, which signifies doctor, or rather priest, * * * * We named the place 'Priest Rapids' after him." (Oregon Settlers, Early Western Travels edition, pages 143-144.) The name was charted by David Thompson and appears in the writings of the early travelers as well as on recent maps.

Prindle, a town on the Columbia River, in the southwestern part of Skamania County. The place was formerly called Cruzatt in honor of Peter Cruzatte of the Lewis and Clark expedition, by which Wind River had been named "Cruzatte River" in 1805. The Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway Company changed the name of the station to honor Ernest Hinsdale Prindle, a pioneer land owner there. (F. C. Oilman, in Names MSS. Fetter 590.) The first Prindle known in America was at New Milford, Connecticut, in 1654. There were 31 of the names of Prindle or Pringle in the Revr (I couldn't read what should be here) named in honor of John Proebstel, a pioneer in that district (Chauncey Price, of Sifton, in Names MSS. Fetter 181.)

Prosser, county seat of Benton County, named in honor of William Farrand Prosser, early homesteader there. He was a prominent citizen of the Territory and State of Washington, who died in Seattle on September 23, 1911, aged 77 years. The place was long known as Yakima Falls. (Robert M. Graham, of Mabton, in Names Mss. Letter 297.) It was also known as Lone Tree, the first post office being, called by that name. (W. M. Scott, of Kiona, in Names MSS. Letter 586.)

Protection Island, off the entrance to Port Discovery, in the northwestern part of Jefferson County. On May 2, 1792, while describing Port Discovery, Captain George Vancouver wrote: "Had this insular production of nature been designed by the most able engineer, it could not have been placed more happily for the protection of the port, not only from the N. W. winds to the violence of which it would otherwise be greatly exposed, but against all attempts of an enemy, when properly fortified; and hence I called it Protection Island." (Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume II., page 67.) Manuel Quimper called it "Isla de Carrasco" probably after his Pilot's Mate, Don Juan Carrasco. Other Spaniards used the same name. (Charts reproduced in United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1557.) The Indian name is reported as Chachanucah. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII., Part I., chapter XV, page 280.)

Ptehnum River, see Manastash Creek.
Puak-ooke, an Indian name for Mount Rainier. (J. A. Costello, The Swash, Seattle, 1895.)
Puerto de Alava, see Cape Alava.

Puerto de Los Angeles, see Port Angeles.
Puerto de ea Bodega y Quadra, see Port Discovery.
Puerto de Gray, see Grays Harbor.
Puerto de Nuestra de los Angeles, see Port Angeles.
Puerto de Nunez, see Neah Bay.
Puerto de Quadra, see Port Discovery.
Puerto de Quimper, see New Dungeness Bay.
Puffin dee Socorro, see Chuckanut Bay.

Puffin Island, one of the Matia Islands in the northeastern part of San Juan County. It was named from the tufted puffins nesting there. (British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.) The United States Coast Survey changed the name to "Matia East". (Captain George Davidson, Pacific Coast Pilot, page 569, note.) The United States Coast and Geodetic Survey has restored the name, Puffin Island. (Chart 6380.)

Pugallup, see Puyallup.

Puget Bar, in the Columbia River between Puget and Tenas Illihee Islands, named for the larger island.

Puget City, on Hogum Bay in the north central part of Thurston County, named from Puget Sound.

Puget Island, in the Columbia River, in the southeastern part of Wahkiakum County. It was named by Lieutenant W. R. Broughton on October 26, 1792, in honor of Lieutenant Peter Puget. (Captain George Vancouver, Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume III., page 95.) The Lewis and Clark expedition named it Sturgeon Island in 1805. (Journals, Thwaites edition, Volume III., page 206.)

Puget Sound, a name much extended beyond its original application. While anchored near Restoration Point, opposite the present City of Seattle, Captain Vancouver sent Lieutenant Peter Puget and Mr. Whidbey in the launch and cutter to explore the waters to the southward. They were to take the western passage. They started on Saturday, May 19, 1792. One week later, Captain Vancouver and Lieutenant Joseph Baker followed in the yawl, taking the eastern channel. Discovering the large island between the two channels, it was named Vashon Island. Both parties had returned to the ships by May 29, when the record shows: "Thus by our joint efforts, we had completely explored every turning of this extensive inlet; and to commemorate Mr. Puget's exertions, the south extremity of it I named Puget's Sound." (Captain George Vancouver, Voyage of Discovery Round the World, second edition, Volume II, page 146.) The chart in Vancouver's work shows the name to apply to the bays and inlets south of the present Tacoma and The Narrows. William A. Slacum, a purser in the United States Navy, was sent to the Pacific Northwest in 1836. In a memoir dated March 26, 1837, he refers to the "Straights of Juan de Fuca" and "Plight's Sound" thus extending the name so as to include Admiralty Inlet. (Document 24, in United States Public Documents, Serial Number 314.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, clung to Vancouver's purpose by applying the name south of The Narrows. (Hydrography, Volume XXIII., Atlas, chart 78.) An act of Congress approved February 14, 1851, established the Collection District of Puget Sound, giving legal authority for great inclusiveness as to the name. Captain George B. McClellan, in 1853, wrote: "I mean here, by Puget Sound, the sheet of water made up of the sound properly so called, Admiralty Inlet, Bellingham Bay, etc." (Pacific Railroad Reports. Volume I., chapter XVIII, page 183.) In 1857, James G. Swan uttered a complaint as follows: "A strange geographical error has gained credence in the commercial world of calling all the waters on the north of Washington Territory Puget Sound. This error has been principally caused by ignorant newspaper reporters, particularly those of San Francisco, who always report vessels arriving from any of the different harbors in Fuca Strait as from Puget Sound." (The Northwest Coast, page 119.) On August 7, 1859, General W. S. Harvey, United States Army, wrote to the senior officer of the United States Navy, commanding the squadron on the Pacific Coast: "I have the honor to enclose for your information a copy of a proclamation of Governor Douglas, the executive officer of her Britannic Majesty's Island of Vancouver, in Puget's Sound." (Document 10, page 20, in United States Public Documents, Serial Number 1027.) In 1866, the Washington Territorial Legislature adopted a memorial to Secretary of State Seward in regard to the San Juan Islands, "situated in the waters of Puget Sound." (Laws of Washington, 1866, page 225.) In Bellingham, May 1, 1913, Judge Ralston, of the Superior Court of Clallam County, rendered a decision holding that, for the purposes of the fishing laws, the Strait of Juan de Fuca is a part of Puget Sound. (Seattle Times, May 1, 1913.) The Indian name of Puget Sound is Whulge. (Theodore Winthrop, The Canoe and the Saddle, J. H. Williams edition, page 9.) For biographies see Edmond S. Meany's Vancouver's Discovery of Puget Sound, pages 148-152, and John T. Walbran's British Columbia Coast Names, pages 404-405.)

Puget Sound Naval, Station, see Navy Yard, Puget Sound.

Pu-kal-bush, an Indian name for Deschutes River at Turnwater. (J. A. Costello, The Siwash, Seattle, 1895.)

Pul-le-la, see Squaxin Island.

Pullman, a city in the southeastern part of Whitman County, home of the State College of Washington. The place was first named "Three Forks", being at the junction of three small streams.

The town adopted the new name in the hope that George M. Pullman, car manufacturer, would endow it, which hope was never realized. (Lou. E. Wenhard in Names Mss. Letter 115.)

Punta de ea Bastida, see Point Grenville.
Punta Capeda, see Point Roberts.
Punta de Herrera, see Eagle Point.
Punta de Hifosa, see Cape Alava.
Punta Loera, see Sandy Point.
Punta de Los Martires, see Point Grenville.
Punta de Martinez, see Cape Flattery.
Punta de Mendez, see Point Partridge.
Punta de Rada, see Koitlah Point.
Punta de Salvi, see Observatory Point.
Punta de Santa Cruz, see Dungeness Spit.
Punta de San Juan, see Clallam.
Punta de Senor Jose, see Birch Point.
Punta de Solano, see Point William.

Purdy, a town on Carr Inlet in the northwestern part of Pierce County, named for a pioneer grocer in Tacoma who furnished lumber for the first school house in the place. (Mary J. Goldman, of Wauna, in Navies Mss. Letter 257.)

Puyallup, the name of a town in Pierce County, of a river which flows into Commencement Bay and a glacier on Mount Rainier where the river has its principle source. The Indian word has been variously spelled. (Handbook of American Indians, Part 2, page 331.) Two distinct meanings are given for the word. Elwood Evans in an address published in the New Tacoma Ledger of July 9, 1880, says the word means shadow from the dense shade of the forest. (Quoted by H. H. Bancroft: History of Washington, Idaho and Montana, Page 66.) Henry Sicade, an educated Indian says in the Tacoma News for June 30, 1916, that Pough means generous and allup means people and so his tribe were known as generous people. John Work, of the Hudson's Bay Company, in 1824 called it "Qualax River". (Washington Historical Quarterly, July, 1912, page 212.) The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in naming and charting Commencement Bay indicated Puyallup River but seem to have spelled it "Pugallup." (Volume XXIII, Hydrography, page 319, and the atlas, chart 87.) The town's first post office was named "Franklin" which caused much difficulty on account of there being so many post offices by that name. Ezra Meeker says: "We agreed there never would be but one Puyallup." (Pioneer Reminiscences, page 182.)

Pyramid Butte, see Steptoe Butte.
Pysht River, see Fish River.



Washington AHGP | Geographic Names

Source: Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume 8 - 14


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