Part of the American History and Genealogy Project

 

 Yakima County Newspapers

North Yakima*
Washington Farmer, established on September 20, 1884, by the Capital Publishing Company, Legh R. Freeman, managing editor.

Yakima Democrat issued on October 3, 1888. Edwin N. Fuller says: "Memorandum on the margin of the first number, "Stopped by Mr. Reed January, '89'." (Washington Press Association Proceedings, 1887-1890, page 86.)

Yakima Herald, established in 1889 by Messrs. Reed & Co., as a seven-column folio and Democratic in sentiment. (Charles Prosch in Washington Press Association Proceedings, 1887-1890, page 42.) In 1890, it was listed by Lord & Thomas as an independent weekly. (Newspaper Directory.)

Yakima Republic, before the founding of North Yakima, this paper was established as the Yakima Record on September 6, 1879, by Richard T. Chadd. It was the first paper published in Yakima County. In May, 1883, Mr. Chadd sold the paper to Charles M. Holton, the new firm being known as C. M. Holton & Son. "It is a Republican journal of the stalwart kind." (Charles Prosch in Washington Press Association Proceedings, 1887-1890, page 42.) No files of the paper have been reported.

Yakima Signal, founded on January 6, 1883, by Mr. J. M. and Mrs. P. D. Adams. In 1885, this paper joined in the removal from Yakima (now Union Gap) to North Yakima (now Yakima) and three years later, 1888, the paper suspended. (Edward N. Fuller, Washington Press Association Proceedings, 1887-1890, page 81.) No files of the paper have been reported.

 

 

Footnotes:
* By an act of the State Legislature, approved January 30, 1917 and to go into effect on January 1, 1918, this city was permitted to drop the word "South" from the name it had worn from the winter of 1884-1885. During those years an older town, four miles distant had been known as Yakima. By act of the same recent Legislature, that name was changed to Union Gap. The territorial papers are here listed under North Yakima, the Territorial named of the town.

The place of publication was Yakima, the name of which place was changed to Union Gap by act of the State Legislature, approved March 10, 1917. In the winter of 1884-1885 most of the buildings and citizens were moved from Yakima four miles to North Yakima and the Washington Farmer went with them. In 1889, the paper was again moved to Gibraltar (since changed to Dewey), Skagit County. (Charles Prosch, Washington Press Association Proceeding, 1887-1890, page 42.)

Washington AHGP |  County Newspapers

Source: Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume 13-14, 1923


Please Stop by again!!

AHGP

Back to Washington AHGP

This page was last updated

Copyright August @2011 -  AHGP - Judy White
For the exclusive use and benefit of The American History and Genealogy Project.