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Gamble ~ Guye Mountain Origin Washington Geographical Names

Gamble ~ Guye Mountain Origin of Washington Geographic Names

Gamble, see Port Gamble.
Gamler's River, see Coppei.
Garde Station, see Tukwila, King County.

Gardina, in Walla Walla County. It was platted by the Walla Walla Irrigation Company. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 167.)

Gardner, an old settlement on the north side of the Toutle River at its junction with the Cowlitz. (Map of the Surveyor-General of Washington Territory, 1857.)

Garfield County, authorized by the Legislature of Washington Territory on November 29, 1881, and named in honor of President James A. Garfield. Eastern Washington newspapermen disputed over the honor of having suggested the name chosen for the county. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, page 510.)

Garrison Bay, at the north end of San Juan Island, in San Juan County. The name arose from the establishment of the British garrison nearby prior to the arbitration of the San Juan boundary dispute. Gaston Bay, see Bellingham.

Gate, a town in Thurston County. It was formerly called Gate City from the fact that the Black Hills run close to Black River at this place, and the Chehalis River on the south draws the valley to its narrowest point. Beyond the valley widens toward the Grays Harbor country, and the little city was looked upon as the gateway to that region. Hopes were held that the Northern Pacific Railroad Company would build great shops there instead of at South Tacoma. In the panic of 1893 Gate City's boom collapsed. (G. J. Gaisell, in Names MSS., Letter 441.)

Gedney Island, between the city of Everett and Whidbey Island, in Island County. It is often called Hat Island on account of its shape. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. A dozen or more years later Captain Wilkes told J. G. Kohl that he had named the island after a friend. The rosters of his squadron show no man by that name. It is possible that the friend honored was the inventor, Jonathan Haight Gedney, of New York, who lived an eventful life from 1798 to 1886. Dr. Charles M. Buchanan, of Tulalip, says (in Names MSS., Letter 155) that the Indian name for the island is Chuh-chuh-sul-lay.

Gee Creek, a tributary of the Columbia River at Ridgefield, Clarke County, named in honor of an old donation land claim settler b}' the name of Gee. (J. W. Blackburn of Ridgefield, in Names MSS., Letter 127.)

Geese Islets, several small islands off the southeast coast of Lopes Island, San Juan County, The group thus named includes Long Island, Whale Rocks, Mummy Rocks and Buck Island. The name of Geese Islets was given by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841.

George Creek, a branch of Asotin Creek in Asotin County. In early days when white settlers were few, Indian George trapped and fished on that creek, which gave rise to its name. (James Buchan of Jerry, in Names MSS., Letter 366.)

Georgetown, now a part of Seattle, King County. The land owner was Julius Horton, who in 1890 platted the town and named it in honor of his son, George M. Horton. (H. K. Hines, Illustrated History of Washington, pages 295 and 751.)

Georgia Strait, a broad strait north of the San Juan Archipelago and separating Vancouver Island from the mainland. The Spanish explorer Eliza, 1791, named the waterway "Gran Canal de Nuestra Senora del Rosario la Marinera." The English Captain Vancouver, 1792, apparently did not know of the Spanish name, so he charted it "Gulf of Georgia," from which it has come to be Georgia Strait. Vancouver had called the country "New Georgia" in honor of George III of England. Extending the name to the gulf or strait intensified the honor intended for his king.

Gertrude, a post office on the northern shore of McNeil Island, Pierce County. The name is undoubtedly obtained from the adjacent small island, though slightly different in spelling.

Gertrudis Island, a small island off the northeast shore of McNeil Island, Pierce County. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 1947, Inskip, 1846. The name appears with this spelling on the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6460, dated 1911.

Getchell, a town east of Marysville in Snohomish County, platted by L. W. Getchell about 1894, his name being given to the town. (Julian Hawthorne, History of Washington, Volume I, pages 437-438.) Gettysburg, a town on the Strait of Juan de Fuca, in Clallam County. It was named about 1897 after Bob Getty, a lumberman or logger. (C. C. Dirkes, in Names MSS., Letter 309.)

Gibraltar, see Dewey.

Gibson Point, the south cape of Fox Island, in Pierce County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of James H. Gibson, coxswain in one of the crews. The name is often charted as "Point Gibson." In 1846, Inskip wrote the name of "Patterson Point" at this place, intending the honor for Lieutenant George Y. Patterson of the Fisgard, the British vessel on this station. The older name of Gibson Point has remained on recent charts.

Gifford, a town on the Columbia River, in Stevens County. It was named for James O. Gifford, a pioneer of 1890. (Postmaster at Gifford, in Names MSS., Letter 106.)

Gig Harbor, a small harbor and town opposite Point Defiance, Pierce County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, saying "has a sufficient depth of water for small vessels." (Hydrography, page 319.)

Gilman, King County, see Issaquah.

Gilman Park, see Ballard, King County.

Gilmer, a creek and post office in Klickitat County. The creek is a tributary of the White Salmon River. The name is an honor for George W. Gilmer, a pioneer who served as postmaster at Gilmer for thirty-seven years. (Emil C. Iven and George W. Gilmer, in Names MSS., Letter 528.)

Glacier, a town in the northern part of Whatcom County. It was named for a large glacier on the nearby Mount Baker. (Lucy S. Drake of Glacier, in Names MSS., Letter 142.)

Glenavon, see Lindberg, Lewis County.

Glencove, a town in Pierce County. It was first known as Balch's Cove after a man named Balch, who logged there in early days. Why or when the name was changed has not been learned. (Cora M. Smyth of Elgin, in Names MSS., Letter 176.)

Glendale, Snohomish County, see Trafton.

Glendale, a town on Cultus Bay, Whidbey Island, in Island County. It was named in 1907 by Mrs. E. M. Peck on account of the beauty of the place. (Edward F. Peterson in Names MSS., Letter 423.)

Glenoma, a town in Lewis County do not know the exact date of the establishment of the post office at Glenoma. I was asked to send them a name suitable for that particular location. I chose Glen, 'a valley and oma, an old Hebrew word meaning a measure of grain.' A liberal translation is 'fruitful valley.' "(Mrs. Beverly W. Coiner of Tacoma, in Names MSS., Letter 576.)

Glenwood, a town in Klickitat County, evidently named because it is in a small valley surrounded by forests. There is another locality using the same name in Whitman County, between Elberton and Colfax. It is a glen in the woods but has no post office, the mail going on Route 1 from Elberton. (W. B. Peoples of Elberton, in Names MSS., Letter 214.)

Goat Creek, Okanogan County, see Mazama.

Goat Peak, south of Easton in Kittitas County. It was named because goats abound there. (A. W. Johnson, in Names MSS., Letter 496.)

Goat Rocks, remarkable peaks in the Cascade Range about twenty miles north of Mount Adams. Named on account of the number of mountain goats seen there in early days.

Gobar River, see Coweman River.

Godfrey, a town in Stevens County, named in 1909 after Godfrey Brothers, who had a sawmill there. (W. O. Lee of Evans, in Names MSS., Letter 139.)

Gold Bar, a town on the Skykomish River in Snohomish County. The region was named by prospectors in 1869. The town by the same name was platted on September 18, 1900, by the Gold Bar Improvement Company. (Postmaster of Gold Bar, in Names MSS., Letter 566.)

Gold Mountain, east of Darrington in Snohomish County. It was named by Charles Burns because he thought the mountain was full of minerals. (Charles E. Moore of Darrington, in Names MSS., Letter 193.)

Golden, a former town in Okanogan County, named after a gold mine since deserted. (W. J. Yard of Loomis, in Names MSS., Letter 264.)

Goldendale, county seat of Klickitat County. It was named in honor of John J. Golden, who homesteaded the land on which the townsite was located in 1872. (L. C. Gilman, in Names MSS., Letter 590.)

Goldsboro Lake, see Mineral Lake.

Goodel, a former pioneer settlement on Scatter Creek, near Grand Mound in Thurston County.

Goodman Creek, a small creek emptying into the Pacific Ocean, western Jefferson County. It was named for a man working on the township survey in 1890. (Isaac Anderson of Hoh, in Names MSS., Letter 157.)

Goodnow, a railroad station in Klickitat County. It was formerly called Harbin but was changed, ostensibly to agree with the post office Goodnoe Hills, to Goodnow. (L. C. Gilman, in Names MSS., Letter 590.)

Goodwin, see Ward, Stevens County.

Goose Island, near Cattle Point on the southeastern end of San Juan Island, San Juan County. It first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2840, Richards, 1858-1860.

Goose Point, an old settlement on Willapa Harbor, Pacific County. Flocks of geese made the east side of the point a favorite feeding and resting place. (L. L. Bush, in Names MSS., Letter 97.) Gordon Island, a small island, was charted by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, as northeast of Waldron Island, in San Juan County. George Davidson of the United States Coast Survey, 1853, denied the existence of such an island, and subsequent charts have omitted the island and its name.

Gordon Lake, see American Lake.

Gordon Point, near Steilacoom in Pierce County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted it as "Qulam Point." The British Admiralty Chart 1947, Inskip, 1846, is the first to show the point with its present name. Captain R. M. Inskip thus sought to honor George Thomas Gordon, commander of Her Majesty's steam sloop Cormorant, the first steam naval vessel on this station, 1846-1850. See also Cormorant Passage. E. E. Bair of the Iron Springs Hotel, nearby, declared on April 7, 1917, that the local name had long been "Salter's Point," from the fact that Captain John Salter had once owned the land there. (Victor J. Farrar, in Names MSS., Letter 340.)

Gossip Islands, small islands just south of Stuart Island in San Juan County. The name appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2840, Richards, 1858-1860, but does not appear on the charts of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Gould City, in Garfield County. It was platted on February 17, 1891, by George R. McPherson and T. E. Griffith. (History of Southeastern Washington, page 547.) The "City" does not appear in recent issues of the United States Postal Guide.

Gourd Island, see Patos Island.

Govan, a town in Lincoln County, named for one of the engineers of the Washington Central (now Northern Pacific) Railroad. (C. G. Barnet, in Names MSS., Letter 169.)

Gran Canal de Nuestra del Rosario la Marinera, see Georgia Strait and Rosario Strait. The longer name for those waters was placed on the Spanish chart by Eliza in 1791.

Grand Coulee, beginning near the Columbia River in the northeastern portion of Douglas County and extending for more than twenty miles southwestward, enters Grant County. It has been suggested that perhaps it was a former bed of the Columbia River. John Work, of the Hudson's Bay Company, mentioned it as "Grand Coolley" on July 24, 1825. (T. C. Elliott, in Washington Historical Quarterly, April, 1914, page 100.) David Douglas, the botanist, made an entry in his journal August 21, 1826, in which he said the voyageurs called "this wonderful specimen of nature" by the name of Grand Coulee. (Journal of David Douglas, 1823-1827, page 208.) It is called "Grande Coulle" in the journal of the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Hydrography, page 67.) Lieutenant Arnold used the present name and described the geographic feature in 1853. Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume I, page 110.)

Grand Dalles, a town in Klickitat County, on the Columbia River, opposite The Dales, Oregon. See The Dalles.

Grand Junction, in Asotin County. See Jerry. Grand Mound, a town in Thurston County, receiving its name from the peculiar mounds, baffling to geologists, which gave the name to Mound Prarie.

Grand Rapids. This name and "Great Rapid" were used by early travelers for what are now known as Cascades, in the Columbia River. The same name is now used for rapids in the Columbia River about two and one-half miles below the mouth of the Colville River in Ferry and Stevens Counties. The name is descriptive.

Grande Ronde, an ellipse-shaped valley surrounded by mountains in the northeastern part of Oregon. The river flowing out of the valley bears the same name and empties into the Snake River after passing through the southern part of Asotin County. The name is of French Canadian origin, and means "Great Round," referring to the shape of the valley.

Grandview, a town in Yakima County. In 1906, F. L. Pittman and Elza Dean, members of the townsite company, were searching for a name. While standing on the bank of an irrigating ditch, looking at the distant snow mountains, Adams and Rainier, Mr. Pittman remarked: "What a grand view!" and Mr. Dean replied: "That's the name." (Chapen D. Foster, editor of Grandview Herald, in Names MSS., Letter 527.)

Grandy Creek, a tributary of the Skagit River, in Skagit County, named for John Grandy, who located there in 1878. A large fish hatchery is maintained there by the United States government. (Postmaster, Birdsview, in Names MSS., Letter 130.)

Grange City, a town in Columbia County. During the Granger movement of 1875, Colonel George Hunter canvassed among the Grangers, and with the money raised he built a warehouse in the spring of 1876. From this arose the name of Grange City. (Illustrated History of Southeastern Washington, pages 376-377.)

Granger, a town in the east-central part of Yakima County, established in 1902 and named in honor of Walter N. Granger. (Clinton A. Snowden, History of Washington, Volume V, page 256.)

Granite Falls, a town in Snohomish County, named from the falls in the Stillaguamish River, where the bed of the stream and walls of the canyon are of granite. (Frank Niles, in Names MSS., Letter 350.) Early traders among the Indians called the place "Portage." William M. Turner and F. P. Kistner settled there in 1884 and the railroad put in its appearance in 1889. On August 4, 1891, the townsite was recorded, the promoters being S. W. Holland and T. K. Robe. (History of Skagit and Snohomish Counties, pages 364-366.)

Granite Lake, in Spokane County, named by W. F. Bassett. (H. S. Bassett, in Names MSS., Letter 327.)

Granite Point, a local name and camping place on Loon Lake in Stevens County. (Evan Morgan, Loon Lake, in Names MSS., Letter 109.)

Grant, a post office on the west bank of Pickering Pass, Mason County. Miss Mary Grant, school teacher, became postmistress when the office was established and named for her in 1900. Though the office has been twice moved to the northward the same name has been retained. (Clara M. Strong, postmistress, in Names MSS., Letter 207.)

Grant Couty, created by state law approved on February 24, 1909. The name was given in honor of President Ulysses S. Grant. Grant Orchards, a post office in the central part of Grant County. The name came from the town being in the principal fruit district of the county. (Postmaster of Grant Orchards, in Names MSS., Letter 448.)

Grass Bay, see Grays Bay.

Gravel, see Longview, Benton County.

Gray, a town on the Colville River, in Stevens County. It was named for William Gray, who at the time owned the 700-acre timothy hay ranch at that place. (Postmaster at Gray, in Names MSS., Letter 430.)

Grays Bay, an embayment on the north bank of the lower Columbia River, in the southwestern corner of Wahkiakum County. Lewis and Clark called it "Shallow Nitch." (Journal, Thwaites Edition, Volume III, page 211.) The map in David Thompson's Narrative shows it as "Grass Bay," evidently a typographical error. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted it as "Kutzule Bay." The name now used is an honor for Captain Robert Gray, who discovered and named the Columbia River in 1792. It was given by Lieutenant W. R. Broughton of the Vancouver Expedition of that same year, 1792.

Grays Harbor, on the western shore of the state. On May 7, 1792, Captain Robert Gray, the American explorer, discovered the harbor and named it Bulfinch Harbor in honor of one of the Boston owners of his ship Columbia.- In October of the same year, Vancouver, the English explorer, sent his Lieutenant Joseph Whidbey to survey the new harbor. They called it Gray's Harbor, and as their charts were published, while the American's charts were not, the name prevailed. The Spaniards of that same year, Galiano and Valdez, helped to establish that name by charting it "Puerto de Gray." John Work, of the Hudson's Bay Company, called in "Chihalis Bay" in 1824. (T. C. Elliott, in the Washington Historical Quarterly, July, 1912, page 201.) David Douglas called it "Whitbey Harbor" in 1825. (Journal of David Douglas, 1823-1827, page 60. Even American maps sometimes showed the name as "Whidbey Harbor." (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII, Part II, page 264.)

Grays Harbor County, created as Chehalis County by an act of the Territorial Legislature approved on April 14, 1854. See Chehalis City and River for discussion of that name. In February, 1907, an act of the State Legislature was approved dividing Chehalis County and Creating Grays Harbor County. The State Supreme Court later declared the act "entirely indefinite and uncertain." On March 15, 1915, there was approved a very brief act of the Legislature which simply changed the county's name from Chehalis to Grays Harbor.

Grays Point, on the north bank of the lower Columbia River, in Pacific County. Sir Edward Belcher, in 1839, named it "Cape Broughton" in honor of Vancouver's associate, Lieutenant W. R. Broughton, of the 1792 expedition. Captain George Davidson says the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, called it Grays Point. Also that the earliest United States Coast Survey charts showed it as Cape Broughton, while on later ones it is designated Grays Point. (Pacific Coast Pilot, page 463.) One item is a little confused, since Chart 2 in the atlas accompanying the Wilkes Volume, Hydrography, shows the feature as "Burnie Point," evidently an honor intended for James Birnie, representing the Hudson's Bay Company at Astoria. The name that has prevailed is another honor for the American Captain Robert Gray and naturally arose from the name given the adjacent bay and river.

Grays River, flowing into the lower Columbia River at Grays Bay, Wahkiakum County. The name is for Captain Robert Gray. On the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, chart it has the Indian name Ebokwol, and in 1853 it was given another Indian name, Moolhool. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XI, Part II, Chart 3.)

Great Bend (of the Columbia River), mentioned by Richard Arnold in 1853. (Pacific Railroad, Reports, Volume I, page 284.) The common name for this feature and the region about it is Big Bend. Great Falls of the Columbia, a name frequently used in early records for The Dalles. They are referred to as such by Lewis and Clark, 1805, by Gabriel Franchere and Alexander Ross, 1811, and by David Douglas, 1825.

Great Peninsula, see Indian or Great Peninsula. Great Plains of the Columbia, a name which appears in early records for portions of Eastern Washington and Oregon bordering on the Columbia River.

Great Plateau of Spokane. The country bounded by the Columbia, Spokane and Snake Rivers received that name on James Tilton's Map of a Part of Washington Territory, September, 1859. (In United States Public Documents, Serial No. 1026.) Great South Sea, see Pacific Ocean.

Greenbank, a post office on the eastern shore of Whidbey Island at the entrance to Holmes Harbor, Island County. The name was given in 1906 by Calvin Philips in honor of his boyhood home, Green Bank, Delaware. (Calvin Philips, Seattle, in Names MSS., Letter 23.) Green Lake, in the northern portion of Seattle, King County. The name appears as "Lake Green" on the map by the Surveyor-General of Washington Territory, 1857. (In United States Public Documents, Serial No. 877.) There are several other small bodies of water in the State bearing the same name.

Green Point, on the Strait of Juan de Fuca east of Port Angeles, Clallam County. This name was given by the United States Coast Survey. (See Report for 1854, in United States Public Documents, Serial No. 784.)

Green Point, at the eastern entrance to Carr Inlet, in the northwestern part of Pierce County. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Daniel Green, gunner's mate in one of the crews. Green Point, at the eastern cape of Spieden Island in San Juan County, and another of the same name on the northwestern shore of Fidalgo Island, Skagit County. Both these names first appear on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859. The names were undoubtedly descriptive when given.

Green River, flowing westward from the Cascade Mountains and emptying into White River at Auburn, King County. This river is the source of Tacoma's water supply. The name was descriptive when used by the early writers and map-makers. James G. Swan says the Indian name was Nooscope. (Northwest Coast, page 426.) Lieutenant A. W. Tinkham gives the Indian name as Nook-han-noo. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XI, Part II, Chart 3.) The upper waters were apparently confused by Theodore Winthrop, 1853, with those of the Greenwater River, a mountain tributary of White River. Greens Spur, Whatcom County, see Standard.

Greenville Harbor, a small indentation on the ocean shore south of Point Grenville, Grays Harbor County, is shown with this name on James Tilton's Map of a Part of Washington Territory, September, 1859. (In United States Public Documents, Serial No. 1026.) Such difference in spelling frequently occurs.

Greenwater River, a mountain tributary of White River and forming part of the boundary between Pierce and King Counties. Lieutenant Robert E. Johnson of the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, gives the Indian name as Smalocho.

Greenwood, a post office in Grays Harbor County. It was named in 1914 by John Landers, the oldest settler there, after the Greenwood Timber Company, a large holder of timber in that vicinity. (James W. Finn, in Names MSS., Letter 542.)

Greenwood, on the south side of Nooksack River, near Lynden, Whatcom County. The name arose from the schoolhouse being surrounded with evergreen trees. (Mrs. Phoebe N. Judson, Lynden, in Names MSS., Letter 187.)

Gregor, a station on the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway in Adams County. It was named for a prominent owner of land in that vicinity, McGregor, but was shortened so as to avoid confusion with the name of McAdam, another station on the same division of the railroad. (L. C. Gilman, in Names MSS., Letter 590.)

Griffin Bay, a large bay at the southwest extremity of San Juan Island, San Juan County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted the bay as "Ontario Roads." The British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859, first gave the name Griffin Bay, which has remained on all charts since. The name is an honor for Charles John Griffin, Colonial justice of the Peace, and an official of the Hudson's Bay Company, in charge of their Bellevue Farm on San Juan Island. He maintained the British claims when Isaac N. Ebey, American Collector of Customs, undertook to exercise authority there. The long dispute which ended in arbitration will be discussed under the name of San Juan.

Grindstone, in Pierce County. When the trails to the Tahoma Mining District near North Mowich Glacier, Mount Rainier, were being constructed, 1900, a grindstone was placed at a camp in the woods. All the men went there to grind, and the stone being left there the place became known as Grindstone. (Thomas E. Farrell, in Names MSS., Letter 118.)

Grotto, in the northeastern portion of King County. The place was named from its beauty, many of the deep gorges resembling great caves at a distance. (W. H. Bruchart, in Names MSS., Letter 432.)

Grouse Creek, in the southwestern part of Asotin County. "The grouse were very thick in the early days when I came here, and there are quite a lot of them yet." (Henry Hansen, of Hanson's Ferry, in Names MSS., Letter 236.)

Guemes Island and Channel, in the northwestern part of Skagit County. The Spanish explorer Eliza, 1791, named it ''Isla de Gueme" in honor of the Viceroy of Mexico, under whose orders he had sailed to the Northwest. The Viceroy's full name was Senor Don Juan Vicente de Guemes Pacheco y Padilla Orcasitees y Aguayo, Conde de Revilla Gigedo. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XII, Part I, page 302.) Parts of the long name are in use for geographical names. Vancouver did not attempt to name the island in 1792, but in that year the Spaniards, Galiano and Valdez, repeated Eliza's name as "Isla de Guemes." The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, undertook to change the name to "Lawrence Island" in honor of the famous American naval hero, James Lawrence. To intensify the honor, Wilkes gave the name "Hornet Harbor" to what is now known as Guemes Channel after the vessel Lawrence commanded when he captured the English vessel Penguin in the War of 1812, and to the north of the island he charted "Penguin Harbor," which name has disappeared, being considered a part of the present Bellingham Channel. In 1847, Captain Kellett restored the name Guemes Island on the British Admiralty Chart 1911. That name has been retained on the United States Government charts, which have also added the names of Guemes Channel and Bellingham Channel.

Guerriere Bay, see West Sound, San Juan County.

Guetes Lake, west of Keechelus Lake, Kittitas County. Lieutenant A. W. Tinkham gave it by the Indian name of "Wee-ly-let-sarz Lake" in 1854. (Pacific Railroad Reports, Volume XI, Part II, Chart S.)

Gulf of Georgia, see Georgia Strait.

Gulf Reef, a small reef north of Spieden Island in San Juan County. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2840, Richards, 1858-1860.

Guss Island, in Garrison Bay, San Juan Island, San Juan County. Charles McKay, a pioneer of Friday Harbor, says it was named for Guss Hoffmaster, a German who ran a store for the British camp during the time of joint occupancy of San Juan Island. Guy, see Albion, Whitman County.

Guye Mountain, near Snoqualmie Pass, Cascade Mountains, King County. It was named in honor of F. M. Guye, who located what he called Industry Mine there about 1884. (Rev. H. K. Hines, Illustrated History of Washington, page 618.)

Washington AHGP | Geographic Names

Source: Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume 8 - 14


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