Part of the American History and Genealogy Project

 

Dabop Bay ~ Dyke Point Origin of Washington Geographic Names

Dabop Bay, a large bay of Hood Canal in Jefferson County. The name is of Indian origin and was placed on the chart by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. There is a postoffice at the northern end of the bay by the name of Dabop.

Dago Island, at the mouth of Lake River, in Clarke County. It is sometimes called "Cartys Island." (D. E. Dodd, St. Helens, Oregon, in Names MSS., Letter 267.) This island and the one near it at the mouth of Lewis River were called "Nut Islets" by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841.

Dadah Point. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, gave this name to a point on the east coast of Hood Canal south of Dewatto Bay. Dahop Inlet, see Dabop Bay.

Dalco Passage, the waterway between Point Defiance and the southern end of Vashon Island, where is located Point Dalco. The United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6460 shows both names, and the United States Coast Survey Report for 1868, page 448, says the point was so named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. Dalkena, a town in the southern part of Pend Oreille County, on the Pend Oreille River. The name is a composite from Dalton and Kennedy, mill owners there. (Dalkena Lumber Company, in Names MSS., Letter 143.)

Dalles, see The Dalles.

Dana's Passage, between Hartstene Island and the mainland, forming the boundary between Thurston and Mason Counties. It was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of James Dwight Dana, mineralogist, who was a member of the scientific corps of the expedition.

Danger Rock, southwest of Waldron Island, in San Juan County. It first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Danger Shoal, west of Spieden Island, in San Juan County. It first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Darrington, a town in Snohomish County. It was intended as an honor for a man named Barrington, but the first letter got mixed in conferring the name. (Charles E. Moore, in Names MSS., Letter 193.)

Dartiord, or Dart's Mill, in Spokane County. It was named for the Dart family. (History of Spokane County, page 279.)

Davidson Rock, off the southeast extremity of Lopez Island, in San Juan County, near the entrance to Rosario Strait. It was discovered by the United States Coast Survey in 1854 and named "Entrance Rock." The British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859, recognizes the American discovery by charting it as Davidson Rock. It appears with that name on the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart 6300, corrected to August 27, 1904. George Davidson deserves much greater geographical honors for the work he did on the Pacific Coast.

Davis Bay, see Shoal Bight, Lopez Island. Davis Creek, drains Davis Lake into the Pend Oreille River, Pend Oreille County. They were named for a pioneer of that name who lived on the shore of the lake. (Dalkena Lumber Company, in Names MSS., Letter 143.)

Davis Peak, near Woodland, in Cowlitz County. It was used as a signal point during the Indian wars.

Day City, near the head of Lake Washington, in King County. It was platted in 1889 by Hans Anderson, who owned the land about a half-mile from Woodinville. Day's Mill was there, which explains the name. The "city" is now used for pasture and small farming. (Clara Jacobson Leegarden, in Names MSS., Letter 70.)

Day Creek, drains Day Lake into the Skagit River, Skagit County. They were named in 1882 for the brothers, John and Mike Day, who had a lumber camp there for years. (Matie F. Prenedue, in Names MSS., Letter 34.)

Days Island, just off the mainland east of Fox Island, in Pierce County. This small island was named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. The usual Wilkes scheme of association is here exhibited. The larger island he named Fox in honor of the J. L. Fox, assistant surgeon of the expedition, and the smaller island he named after Stephen W. Days, hospital steward. Dropping the "s" from his name on recent charts is an error.

Dayton, the seat of government in Columbia County. In 1864, there was a postoffice in that vicinity named Touchet. On November 23, 1871, Jesse N. Day and Elizabeth Day, his wife, filed a plat for the city of Dayton. The next year the Touchet postoffice was moved to the new town. Jesse N. Day was born in what is now West Virginia in 1828. He came to Oregon in 1848 and died March 3, 1892. (History of Southwestern Washington, pages 284-285 and 341-342.)

Deadman Bay, a local name for a bay on the west coast of San Juan Island, south of Mount Dallas, San Juan County. It is claimed that the first white man known to have died on the island was buried there. He was a working man killed by a cook.

Deadman Creek, a tributary of the Snake River in the northern part of Garfield County. The winter of 1861-1862 was very severe. Many cattle perished and two miners, probably on their way to the Oro Fino mines, perished. Their bodies were found at a place that has since been known as Deadman Hollow. {History of Southwestern Washington, page 500.) Formerly there was a postoffice in that vicinity by the name of "Deadman." It was discontinued in August, 1880. The name of the creek, arising from the same fatality, is continued on recent maps.

Decatur, a town in San Juan County. It was named for the island, which had been named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, for the naval hero, Stephen Decatur.

Decatur Island, in San Juan County. The eastern cape of the island is named Decatur Head. When the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted the group of islands as "Navy Archipelago" and gave to the various islands and waterways the names of naval heroes, their ships and battles, this island received the name of Decatur. Captain Henry Kellett, 1847, in charting the same region for the British Admiralty, gave many Spanish names but did not disturb the name of Decatur Island. Stephen Decatur was born in 1779 and died in 1820. His father of the same name was also a distinguished officer in the navy. The younger Stephen Decatur had a most eventful career. His first great achievement was the "cutting out of the Philadelphia" in the Tripolitan War, 1804, which Admiral Nelson of the British Navy declared "the most daring act of the age." In the War of 1812, he fought a desperate, uneven and unsuccessful battle in the President. At the end of that war he was sent against the Barbary States of the Mediterranean and completely ended the centuries-old piracy of that region. He received the thanks of all Europe and a beautiful eulogium from President Madison in his message to Congress, December, 1815. Decatur tried honorably to avoid the duel with Commodore Barron, but finally accepted the challenge and was killed. A wave of horrified regret spread over the whole country. It is well to add that his second in the duel was his friend Commodore William Bainbridge, for whom Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, was named, which will lend an interest to the origin of the name of Decatur Reef.

Decatur Reef, off Restoration Point, the southeastern extremity of Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County. During the Indian war of 1855-1856, the little settlement of Seattle was defended by a sloop-ofwar which had been named Decatur in honor of the naval hero, Stephen Decatur.. Later the sloop encountered the reef which was given the vessel's name. In this indirect way, were the names of Bainbridge and Decatur brought close together geographically.

Deception Bay, the name given by the English explorer, Captain John Meares, 1788, to the mouth of the Columbia River. See Cape Disappointment and Columbia River.

Deception City, see Dewey.

Deception Island, a small woded island at the western entrance of Deception Pass, near the boundary between Island and Skagit counties. It was named by the United States Coast Survey in 1854 after the older name of Deception Pass.

Deception Pass, at the northern end of Whidbey Island, forming part of the boundary between Island and Skatgit Counties. This is one of the most remarkable geographical features in the State of Washington. It was named "Boca de Flon" by Eliza on the Spanish chart of 1791, but apparently was not explored then. The English explorer, Captain George Vancouver, 1792, had named the inner waterway Port Gardner. Later, one of his small-boat crews in command of Master Joseph Whidbey found the western entrance of this passage. Vancouver, feeling that he had been "deceived" as to the nature of his Port Gardner, wrote on his chart "Deception Pass." He also honored his officer, who had found the passage and who had thus disclosed the existence of an island, by calling the large area Whidbey Island. (Vancouver's Voyage, second edition, Volume II., page 180.) In giving the first description, Vancouver says: "A very narrow and intricate channel, which, for a considerable distance, was not forty yards in width, and abounded with rocks above and beneath the surface of the water. These impediments, in addition to the great rapidity and irregularity of the tide, rendered the passage navigable only for boats or vessels of very small burthen." On June 18, 1841, the United States brig Porpoise sailed through the passage, and Lieutenant-Commandant Ringgold, of the Wilkes Expedition, reported: "This was not believed by Vancouver to afford a passage for vessels ; but, although narrow, it is feasible for those of small size. The tides rush with velocity through it, and there are some rocks in the passage." (Narrative, Volume IV., page 482.)

Deeah, see Neah Bay.

Deep Creek, a town in the western portion of Spokane County.
The United States Postal Guide runs the words together as Deepcreek. The region was first settled by Daniel and Alfred Stroup. Deep River, a town in Wahkiakum County, on a river that was once called by that name. See Alamicut River.

Deepwater Bay, on the east coast of Cypress Island, in Skagit County. It first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Deer Flat, a settlement on a park-like region near the Blue Mountains, in Asotin County. Frequent appearance of deer gave rise to the name. (Henry Hansen, Hansen Ferry, in Names MSS., Letter 236.)

Deer Harbor, on southwestern shore of Orcas Island, in San Juan County. A town there bears the same name. The name of the harbor first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859.

Deer Lagoon, in Useless Bay at the southern end of Whidbey Island, in Island County. It was named by the United States Coast Survey in 1856. (United States Coast Survey Report, for 1858, page 444.)

Deer Lake, in the southeastern portion of Stevens County. The name arose from the fact that deer swim across a narrow arm of the lake in making a short-cut from Deer Lake Mountain to Telescope and Jump-off Joe Mountains. Men in rowboats find it easy to kill the deer there. (Evan Morgan, Loon Lake, in Names MSS., Letter 109.)

Deer Lake Mountain, takes its name from Deer Lake at its foot. Deer Park, a town in the northern portion of Spokane County. The name recalls a good hunting region of early days.

Deer Point, at the southeastern end of Orcas Island, in San Juan County. Just to the north is Doe Bay. Both names tell of early hunting experiences in that vicinity.

De Fuca, formerly a postoffice in Clallam named by the residents in honor of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. (Postmaster of Dungeness, in Names MSS., Letter 161.)

De Fucas Pillar, see Fuca's Pillar.

De Hayens Knoll, a name given by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, to a knoll on Chehalis Point, Grays Harbor. It was probably intended to honor E. H. De Haven, acting master of the Flying Fish, one of the vessels in the Wilkes squadron.

Delacy's Lake, see Big Lake.

De Lano, a summer resort on Carrs Inlet, Pierce County. It was named for the owners. (Postmaster of Lake Bay, -in Names MSS., Letter 186.)

Delaney, a town in Columbia, named in honor of the resident on whose land the station was established. (William Goodyear, in Names MSS., Letter 43.)

Delrio, a town in Douglas. The first postmistress was Mrs. A. C. Earl. Her granddaughter, Violet Bailey, gave a new name to the place on September 27, 1904. It was first written Del Rio, Spanish for "Of the River," but the postoffice authorities ran the two words together. One of the former postmasters had called the place "Leila" in honor of his wife. (Mrs. Clara Bailey Green, in Names MSS., Letter 47.)

Delta, in Walla Walla County, see Waitsburg.

Delta, a town in Whatcom County. James Bremmer located here in 1880 before there were any roads. On being appointed postmaster, he made his wife deputy and as the two looked over the level country from their home on the hill they chose the name Delta. (Mrs. Phoebe Newton Judson, in Names MSS., Letter 187.)

Deming, a town in Whatcom County, named in honor of George Deming, the first postmaster. (Postmaster at Deming, in Names MSS., Letter 522.)

Denis Rock, see Dennis Shoal.

Denison, a town in Spokane County. The place was first called Buckeye after the Buckeye Lumber Company. That company moved to a place on the Spokane Falls & Northern Railroad named Hockspur. Confusion arose from men still going to the old town of Buckeye for work, and the place was renamed "Pratt." Later the old place was revived by F. H. Buell and, needing a new postoffice, he chose the name Denison, his wife's family name. (L. C. Owen, in Names MSS., Letter 190.)

Dennis Shoal, a quarter of a mile off the southwest face of Allan Island, in Burrows Bay, Skagit County. Captain George Davidson says it was named Denis Rock by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. (Report of the Superintendent of the United States Coast Survey for 1858, page 432.)

Denny Horn, see Tooth.

Denny Tooth, see Tooth.

Dennys, a town in Lincoln, named in honor of William Dennys, an old pioneer settler at the station. (Postmaster at Waukon, in Names MSS., Letter 164.)

Depot Springs, see Cheney.

Deschutes River, in Thurston County, entering Puget Sound at Olympia. The first American settlement north of the Columbia River was at the falls near the mouth of the Deschutes. The town is Turnwater. The name Deschutes originated with the Hudson's Bay Company men, who used the French word for the falls.

Destruction Island, in the Pacific Ocean, off the west shore of Jefferson County. On July 14, 1775, the Spanish Captain Bodega y Quadra sent a small boat's crew ashore for wood and water. Indians murdered the men and stole the boat. The captain called the island "Isla de Dolores," or "Island of Sorrows." In 1787, Captain Barkley, in the Austrian East India Company's ship Imperial Eagle, had a similar experience in the nearby river, which he named "Destruction River." Later the Indian name of Hoh River was used but the word "Destruction" was passed on to the island. As early as April, 1792, Captain George Vancouver refers to Captain Barkley's Destruction Island.

Destruction River, see Hoh River.

Detroit, a town on Case Inlet, Mason County. It was named by the corporation owning and exploiting the townsite about 1891. W. Lair Hill, of Seattle, was president of the corporation. (A. Eckert, in Names MSS., Letter 457.)

Devil's Head, at the western point of the entrance to Drayton Passage, Pierce County. This name is used on the United States Government charts and the feature is described by Captain George Davidson in Pacific Coast Pilot, page 625. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, called it "Park Point," probably in honor of David B. Park of one of the crews. The British Admiralty Chart 1947, Inskip, 1846, shows it as Moore's Bluff.

Dewatto, a creek flowing into Hood Canal, a bay and a town, all bear this name, in Mason County. The name is of Indian origin, Rev. Myron Eells, in the American Anthropologist, for January, 1892, says that in the native mythology certain sprites called tub-ta-ha would enter human beings and make them crazy. Where the creek flows into the bay was called by the Indians du-a-ta as that was supposed to be the place where those sprites came out of the earth. Dewey, a town on the southern part of Fidalgo Island, in Skagit County. The original name was "Deception" on account of its location being near Deception Pass. In 1889, F. J. Carlyle and George Loucke secured holdings at Deception City and platted Fidalgo City. Legh R. Freeman also laid out a town near the other, calling it Gibraltar. After the Spanish-American war the name of Dewey was given to the place in honor of the hero of the battle of Manila Bay. Diamond Hill, the western cape at the entrance to East Sound, Orcas Island, in San Juan County. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859. It does not appear on the United States Government charts.

Diamond Island, a Lewis and Clark name, now Government Island, in the Columbia River. It is an Oregon name as the island is counted part of Multnomah County of that State.

Diamond Point, see Clallam Point.

Dickerson Peninsula, see Quimper Peninsula.

Dickerson Point, west of the entrance to Henderson Inlet, in Thurston County. The name, so spelled on the United States Coast and Geodetic Chart 6460, was first charted by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, as "Dickenson" Point, in honor of Thomas Dickenson, carpenter's mate, in one of the crews.

Dickey River, in Clallam County. The name is said to be derived from the Indian name dickoh dochteador. (Henry Gannett, Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, page 106.) Dinner Island, at western entrance to North Bay, part of Griffin Bay, San Juan Island, in San Juan County. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859. It is claimed that a landing party from a British vessel found a poor harbor where Argyle is now located. They landed on the little island and ate their dinner. When the vessel moved on to Friday Harbor the men spoke of Dinner Island and that name found its way to the charts.

Disappointment, see Cape Disappointment.

Discovery Creek, empties into Port Discovery, Jefferson County. Divide Lake, on top the Cascade Range, at the head of Tunnel Creek, in Kittitas County. The name was suggested by The Mountaineers' Club.

Dixie, a town in the southeastern part of Walla Walla County. Herman C. Actor was the first settler, but more interesting were the three brothers Kershaw, also early settlers. They were musicians and their favorite tune was "Dixie." They became known as the "Dixie" boys. Where they located, the crossing of the creek became known as Dixie Crossing, a Dixie School, Dixie Cemetery, and finally Dixie Station on Doctor Baker's pioneer railroad, completed the evolution of the town's name. (History of Southeastern Washington, pages 166-177.)

Dockton, a postoffice on Maury Island in the southwestern part of King County. It was named by the Puget Sound Dry Dock Company about 1891 when the company had a dock there. (L. Trumbull, in Names MSS., Letter 485.)

Dodd, a former postoffice in Asotin County, named about 1897 for Charles H. Dodd, who had a mail route in that vicinity. Dofflemeyer Point, at the eastern entrance to Budd Inlet, Thurston County. It was named Brown's Point by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of James Brown, carpenter's mate in one of the crews. Its present name came from the pioneer who secured a donation land claim there. In late years, C. D. Hillman attempted to float a real estate scheme there under the name of ''Boston Harbor." Dolphin, a town on the western shore of East Sound, Orcas Island, San Juan County. In March, 1903, three piles were driven about three feet apart and fastened at the top. This is called a dolphin and is used for mooring watercraft. When a postoffice was established in February, 1909, it derived its name from this dolphin on the waterfront. (J. D. Moore, in Names MSS., Letter 493.)

Dolphin Point, the northeast cape of Vashon Island, in King County. It was not named by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841. The name is used in Captain George Davidson's Pacific Coast Pilot, 1889, and on the United States Coast & Geodetic Survey Chart 6460, dated 1891.

Domke Lake, drains through Domke Creek into the northwestern part of Lake Chelan, in Chelan County. There is a mountain in that locality bearing the same name. The name is in honor of the first settler in that vicinity. It is sometimes spelled "Dumpky." (Henry Gannett, Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, page 107.)

Donahue, a former town in Lewis County. See Meskill.

Dot Island, a small island in Padilla Bay, between Hat and Saddlebag Islands, southeast of Guemes Island, in Skagit County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, included the little island in a group under the name of "Porpoise Rocks." The name of Dot Island appears on the United States Coast & Geodetic Survey Chart 6300, corrected to 1904. There is another small island with the same name in Union Bay, Lake Washington, in the City of Seattle. This was named in honor of Miss Dot McGilvra, daughter of John J. McGilvra, the pioneer owner of the land.

Dot Rock, of the southeastern shore of Decatur Island, in San Juan County. It appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859, but does not appear on the United States Government charts.

Doty, a town on the Chehalis River in the western part of Lewis County. It was named in honor of Mr. C. A. Doty, who established a sawmill there about 1900. (T. B. Stidham, in Names MSS., Letter 502.)

Double Bluff, the western cape of Useless Bay, on the southwestern shore of Whidbey Island, in Island County. The name is descriptive and was given by the United States Coast Survey in 1855. (Captain George Davidson, in Pacific Coast Pilot, page 595. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted here the name "Ariels Point," evidently an honor for one of Perry's squadron in the Battle of Erie, 1813.

Double Hill, on Orcas Island, west of the northern extremity of East Sound, in San Juan County. The name is descriptive and first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859. Double Island, near the southwestern entrance to West Sound, Orcas Island, in San Juan County. The name first appears on the British Admiralty Chart 2840, Richards, 1858-1860.

Dougall Point, at the extreme northern end of Hartstene Island, in Mason County. The Wilkes Expedition, 1841, charted the name with one final "1," but left no trace as to the man thus honored. Douglass Channel, see President Channel. The name "Douglas Channel," which has not persisted, was first given on the British Admiralty Chart 2689, Richards, 1858-1859, in honor of Sir James Douglas, Governor of Vancouver Island. The feature thus named is the water way between Orcas and Waldron Islands, in San Juan County.

Douglas County, created on November 28, 1883, and named in honor of Stephen A. Douglas. Lincoln County had been created and named four days earlier showing how impartial were the pioneer legislators when bestowing such honors. In the western part of the county is a town which was named Douglas in 1884 by Ole Rudd in honor of the new county's name. (M. E. Hatcher, in Names MSS., Letter 526.)

Douglas Mountain, in the northern portion of Okanogan County. It was after an old prospector—Douglas Joe. (William J. Yard, in Names MSS., Letter 264.)

Drayton Harbor, the inner portion of Semiahmoo Bay at the northwestern corner of Whatcom County. The whole large bay was named "Drayton Bay" by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, but more recent charts have used the two names. Wilkes thus honored Joseph Drayton, artist on the Vincennes of his squadron.

Drayton Passage, the waterway west of Anderson Island, in Pierce County. The name was given by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of Joseph Drayton, artist, the same as was honored in naming Drayton Harbor.

Drewyers River, a Lewis and Clarke name; see Palouse River. Drumheller, a town in the central part of Franklin County, named in honor of Sam Drumheller, a farmer in that locality. (Peter Klundt, in Names MSS., Letter 27.)

Dry Creek, a tributary of the Walla Walla River, in Walla Walla County. The name first appears on Governor Isaac I. Stevens's map, 1853. (Pacific Railroad, Reports, Volume XII., Book I.) There is now a railroad station by the same name eight miles northwest of Walla Walla. There are also nine other small streams in the State of Washington having the same name.

Dryad, a town on the Chehalis River, in the western part of Lewis County. It was named by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company about 1890. The name means "nymph of the woods." (N. W. Benson, in Names MSS., Letter 72.)

Dryden, a town on the Wenatchee River, in Chelan County. It was named in 1907 by the Great Northern Railway Company, probably in honor of the Canadian horticulturist of that name. He was the guest of Mr. James J. Hill of the Great Northern Railway Company on a tour of that section. (A. J. Amos, in Names MSS., Letter 301.)

Duckabush River, flowing into Hood Canal near the town of the same name. Rev. Myron Eells (American Anthropologist, January, 1892), says the name is derived from the Indian word do-hi-aboos, meaning "a reddish face." The blun° or mountain near the place has a reddish appearance.

Dudah Point, a name on the British Admiralty Chart 1911, Kellett, 1847. See Dewatto.

Du-klaylip, the Indian name for the region around Clifton in Mason County, and means "the head of the bay." Another form of the word is Tulalip, the name of a place in Snohomish County. (Rev. Myron Eells, American Anthropolgist, January, 1892.)

Dumpky Lake, see Domke Lake.

Duncan, a former postoffice in Spokane County. "There is no such place now." (M. H. Sullivan, Spangle, in Names MSS., Letter 153.)

Duncan Bay, see Crescent Harbor.

Duncan Rock, northwest of Tatoosh Island at Cape Flattery, northwest extremity of Clallam County. It was named by Captain George Vancouver, 1792, in honor of Captain Charles Duncan of the British merchant ship Princess Royal, from whom he had obtained valuable geographical information. (R. E. Goswell, Year-Booh of British Columbia, 1897} page 78.) Duncan had served in the Royal Navy as a master. In naming it Vancouver wrote: "The rock, which rises just above the surface of the water, and over which the surf breaks with great violence, I called Rock Duncan, in commemoration of that gentleman's discovery." {Voyage Around the World, second edition, Volume II., pages 46-47.)

Dungeness, a town, harbor and river on the shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, in Clallam County. In April, 1792, Captain George Vancouver wrote: "The low sandy point of land, which from its great resemblance to Dungeness in the British channel, I called New Dungeness. * * * (Voyage Around the World, second edition, Volume II., page 55.) That name, thus applied first to the point or spit, has been extended to other uses.

Duntze Island, see McNeil Island.

Duntze Rock, about a quarter of a mile from Duncan Rock, in the northwest extremity of Clallam County. The name was given by Captain Kellett, 1847. (Captain George Davidson, Pacific Coast Pilot, page 516.) The name is in honor of Captain John Alexander Duntze of the Royal Navy, who was on this station in the Fisgard, 1843-1847.

Dupont, a town in Pierce County near the site of the famous Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Nisqually. The new name arose when there was established in that locality the extensive works of the E. I. du Pont de Nemours Powder Company. (Victor J. Farrar, in Names MSS., Letter 329.)

Du-skwak-sin, see Squaxin.

Duval, a town in the north central part of King County. It was named in honor of James Duvall, the pioneer who obtained the land from the Government in 1875 and held it continuously until the town was begun in 1910. (Postmaster, Duvall, in Names MSS., Letter 471.)

Duwamish Head, the bluff now occupied by West Seattle, King County. It was named by the United States Coast Survey in 1856. (Captain George Davidson, Pacific Coast Pilot, page 607.)

Duwamish River, flowing into Seattle Harbor, which was once known as "Duwamish Bay." Lake Washington was also once known and mapped as "Duwamish Lake." The word is often spelled "Dwamish." The pioneer, Arthur A. Denny, says the correct spelling should be "Dewampsh." (Pioneer Days on Puget Sound, page 44.) Rev. Myron Eells says it is the name of a tribe of Indians and means "the people living on the river," the same as Skokomish and Stilaguamish, but in a different language. (American Anthropologist, January, 1892.) John Work, of the Hudson's Bay Company, wrote in his journal on November 8, 1824, that the Indian name was "Linananimis." (Washington Historical Quarterly, July, 1912, page 213, and note by T. C. Elliott.)

Dyes Inlet, a part of the waterway now generally known as Port Orchard,, in Kitsap County. It lies northwest of Bremerton. The name was given by the Wilkes Expedition, 1841, in honor of John W. W. Dyes, assistant taxidermist on the Vincennes of the Wilkes squadron.

Dyke Point, see Hyde Point.

Washington AHGP | Geographic Names

Source: Washington Historical Quarterly, Volume 8 - 14


Please Stop by again!!

AHGP

Back to Washington AHGP

This page was last updated

Copyright August @2011 -  AHGP - Judy White
For the exclusive use and benefit of The American History and Genealogy Project.